Later Peeps at Parliament Taken from Behind the Speaker's Chair (Google eBook)

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G. Newnes, 1905 - Great Britain - 578 pages
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Page 68 - The place was worthy of such a trial. It was the great hall of William Rufus, the hall which had resounded with acclamations at the inauguration of thirty kings, the hall which had witnessed the just sentence of Bacon and the just absolution of Somers, the hall where the eloquence of...
Page 70 - Heathfield, recently ennobled for his memorable defence of Gibraltar against the fleets and armies of France and Spain. The long procession was closed by the Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of the realm, by the great dignitaries, and by the brothers and sons of the King. Last of all came the Prince of Wales, conspicuous by his fine person and noble bearing.
Page 422 - And the Gileadites took the passages of Jordan before the Ephraimites : and it was so, that when those Ephraimites 5 which were escaped said, Let me go over; that the men of Gilead said unto him, Art thou an Ephraimite ? If he said, Nay ; then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth : and he said Sibboleth : for he could not frame to pronounce it right.
Page 80 - It did; and to prove that she did not keep them waiting, in a few minutes she came into the room in a loose white nightgown and shawl, her nightcap thrown off, and her hair falling upon her shoulders, her feet in slippers, tears in her eyes, but perfectly collected and dignified.
Page 306 - Islam will wither away; and the Englishman, straining far over to hold his loved India, will plant a firm foot on the banks of the Nile and sit in the seats of the Faithful...
Page 5 - I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of goodwill in the abodes of those whose lot it is to labour and to earn their daily bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer leavened by a sense of injustice.
Page 325 - He then began A cut and dry oration. He strove to speak, but the men of Kent Began a grievous shouting ; When out of the waggon the little man went, And put a stop to his spouting. " What though these heretics heard me not...
Page 369 - I have no idea that he will ever acquire the reputation of a great statesman. His views are not sufficiently profound or enlarged for that; his celebrity in the House of Commons will chiefly depend on his readiness and dexterity as a debater, in conjunction...
Page 238 - The Members of the House of Commons have nothing particular in their dress ; they even come into the house in their great coats, and with boots and spurs. It is not at all uncommon to see a member lying stretched out on one of the benches, while others are debating. Some crack nuts, others eat oranges, or whatever else is in season.
Page 538 - Will the British nation,' he asked, ' give their support to men who have thus endeavoured to make the humiliation and degradation of their country the stepping-stone to power?

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