Ampharita: An American Idyll (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Peace Bureau, 1897 - Indians of North America - 244 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 101 - As when a painter, poring on a face, Divinely thro' all hindrance finds the man Behind it and so paints him that his face, The shape and color of a mind and life, Lives for his children, ever at its best...
Page 235 - ... so long-drawn are the notes, and so uninterruptedly are they continued by one individual after another. A short, sharp bark is sounded, followed by several more in quick...
Page 83 - And peradventure had he seen her first She might have made this and that other world Another world for the sick man; but now The shackles of an old love straiten'd him, His honor rooted in dishonor stood, And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.
Page 210 - The game Is played by two persons, who sit facing each other, four or five feet apart. The bone is twirled into the air out of tlie thumb and forefinger, the back of the hand being held upward. The position in which it falls on the ground controls the count In the game. So long as the player succeeds in throwing the pitted side, or cow hoof, as It Is called, upward he retains possession of the bone, and with each throw wins...
Page 235 - One must have spent an hour or two vainly trying to sleep, before he is in a condition to appreciate the full force of the annoyance.
Page 214 - X's horse out of play, and he must start his piece over again ; and again, if he should throw 14, he accomplishes the same result (there is no 1 in the stick count). However, if X should get to c and W throw 10 from house and get to d, he does not kill him. If on the next throw W throws 14 and X has not moved from c, he kills him. A horse must run entirely around the rectangle and back into the house pockets, where he is safe from being killed : but to make him a winning piece, the exact • At this...
Page 211 - ... facing each other, four or five feet apart. The bone is twirled into the air out of the thumb and forefinger, the back of the hand being held upward. The position in which it falls on the ground controls the count in the game. So long as the player succeeds in throwing the pitted side, or cow hoof, as it is called, upward he retains possession of the bone, and with each throw wins one bean from a prearranged number equally divided between the players. The sides do not count in the play, and the...
Page xiii - THE old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfils himself in many ways.
Page 211 - ... upward. The position in which it falls on the ground controls the count In the game. So long as the player succeeds in throwing the pitted side, or cow hoof, as It Is called, upward he retains possession of the bone, and with each throw wins one bean from a prearranged number equally divided between the players. The sides do not count in the play, and the thrower may play again and again without forfeiting the bone until he throws the flat side, opposite the cow hoof, upward, when the bone goes...
Page 213 - These usually number two for each player. They are put Into play consecutively and by alternate throws of the players. A throw of less than 5, which does not carry the horses out of the door, prevents a player from entering another horse until his aggregate throws are 5+, thus putting his horse into the rectangle proper. After all the horses of a single contestant are in play he may move the same horse continuously. In counting, the pockets from A to either of the nearest corners is 15. It is optional...

Bibliographic information