Airplane Flying Handbook: Federal Aviation Administration

Front Cover
Federal Aviation Administration, F.A.A.
Skyhorse Publishing Inc., May 1, 2007 - Transportation - 288 pages
10 Reviews
This official U.S. government guide to piloting aircraft—created by the Federal Aviation Administration—is the essential resource for finding the knowledge and skills to fly all types of planes. It includes an introduction to flight training and official information on ground operations, basic flight maneuvers, slow flight, stalls and spins, takeoff and departure climbs, ground reference maneuvers, airport traffic patterns, approaches and landings, performance maneuvers, and night operations. Pilots will find information on transitioning from small aircraft to more complex airplanes, as well as detailed explanations of emergency procedures. Each topic is coupled with colorful, detailed illustrations to aid the reader. Any pilot who wishes to maintain a current understanding of aircraft operation must read this book.
  

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Expensive
Why pay what you can get for free on FAA website?

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Its a pretty good book,well thays my opion,every body has there own opion so its your opion on this book wheeater you like it or not.Its a awsome book to me i have to say.

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction to Flight Training Purpose of flight training Role of the faa
1-1
Role of the pilot examiner
1-2
Sources of flight training
1-3
Flight safety practices COLLISION AVOIDANCE
1-4
RUNWAY INCURSION AVOIDANCE
1-5
USE OF CHECKLISTS POSITIVE TRANSFER OF CONTROLS
1-6
Ground Operations Visual inspection
2-1
INSIDE THE COCKPIT
2-2
LAZY EIGHT
9-6
Night Operations Night vision
10-1
Night illusions
10-2
Airplane equipment and lighting
10-3
Preparation and preflight
10-4
Takeoff and climb
10-5
Approaches and landings
10-6
Night emergencies
10-8

OUTER WING SURFACES AND TAIL SECTION
2-4
FUEL AND OIL
2-5
ENGINE AND PROPELLER
2-6
Ground operations Engine starting
2-7
Hand propping
2-8
Taxiing
2-9
After landing Clear of runway Parking
2-11
Postflight Securing and servicing
2-12
Basic Flight Maneuvers The four fundamentals Effects and use of the controls
3-1
Attitude flying
3-2
Integrated flight instruction
3-3
Straightandlevel flight
3-4
Trim control
3-6
Level turns
3-7
Climbs and climbing turns
3-13
Descents and descending turns
3-15
Pitch and power
3-19
Slow Flight Stalls and Spins Introduction Slow flight FLIGHT AT LESS THAN CRUISE AIRSPEEDS FLIGHT AT MINIMUM CONTROLLABLE A...
4-1
RECOGNITION OF STALLS
4-3
FUNDAMENTALS OF STALL RECOVERY
4-4
USE OF AILERONSRUDDER IN STALL RECOVERY
4-5
APPROACHES TO STALLS IMMINENT STALLSPOWERON OR POWEROFF
4-6
FULL STALLS POWEROFF
4-7
FULL STALLS POWERON
4-8
ACCELERATED STALLS
4-9
CROSSCONTROL STALL
4-10
ELEVATOR TRIM STALL
4-11
Spins
4-12
ENTRY PHASE INCIPIENT PHASE
4-13
DEVELOPED PHASE
4-14
Intentional spins
4-15
WEIGHT AND BALANCE REQUIREMENTS
4-16
Takeoffs and Departure Climbs General Terms and definitions
5-1
Normal takeoff TAKEOFF ROLL
5-2
LIFTOFF
5-3
INITIAL CLIMB
5-4
TAKEOFF ROLL
5-5
INITIAL CLIMB
5-6
Ground effect on takeoff
5-7
Shortfield takeoff and maximum performance climb
5-8
LIFTOFF INITIAL CLIMB
5-9
TAKEOFF ROLL LIFTOFF INITIAL CLIMB
5-10
Noise abatement
5-11
Ground Reference Maneuvers Purpose and scope Maneuvering by reference to ground objects
6-1
Drift and ground track control
6-2
Rectangular course
6-4
Sturns across a road
6-6
Turns around a point
6-7
EIGHTS ALONG A ROAD
6-9
EIGHTS AROUND PYLONS
6-11
EIGHTSONPYLONS PYLON EIGHTS
6-12
Airport Traffic Patterns Airport traffic patterns and operations Standard airport traffic patterns
6-17
Approaches and Landings Normal approach and landing BASE LEG
8-1
FINAL APPROACH
8-2
USE OF FLAPS
8-3
ESTIMATING HEIGHT AND MOVEMENT
8-4
ROUNDOUT FLARE
8-5
TOUCHDOWN
8-6
AFTERLANDING ROLL
8-7
Intentional slips
8-10
POWER
8-11
CONFIGURATION
8-12
Crosswind approach and landing CROSSWIND FINAL APPROACH
8-13
CROSSWIND TOUCHDOWN CROSSWIND AFTERLANDING ROLL
8-15
MAXIMUM SAFE CROSSWIND VELOCITIES
8-16
Shortfield approach and landing
8-17
Softfield approach and landing
8-19
90 POWEROFF APPROACH
8-21
180 POWEROFF APPROACH
8-23
360 POWEROFF APPROACH
8-24
Emergency approaches and landings simulated
8-25
LOW FINAL APPROACH HIGH FINAL APPROACH
8-27
USE OF POWER HIGH ROUNDOUT
8-28
FLOATING DURING ROUNDOUT
8-29
BOUNCING DURING TOUCHDOWN
8-30
PORPOISING
8-31
HARD LANDING TOUCHDOWN IN A DRIFT OR CRAB
8-32
WING RISING AFTER TOUCHDOWN
8-33
DYNAMIC HYDROPLANING REVERTED RUBBER HYDROPLANING VISCOUS HYDROPLANING
8-34
Performance Maneuvers Performance maneuvers STEEP TURNS
9-1
STEEP SPIRAL
9-3
CHANDELLE
9-4
Transition to Complex Airplanes High performance and complex airplanes Wing flaps FUNCTION OF FLAPS
11-1
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
11-2
Controllablepitch propeller
11-3
TAKEOFF CLIMB AND CRUISE
11-4
GOVERNING RANGE CONSTANTSPEED PROPELLER OPERATION
11-5
GROUND BOOSTING VS ALTITUDE TURBOCHARGING
11-7
HEAT MANAGEMENT
11-8
OVERBOOST CONDITION LOW MANIFOLD PRESSURE Retractable landing gear LANDING GEAR SYSTEM
11-9
LANDING GEAR SAFETY DEVICES EMERGENCY GEAR EXTENSION SYSTEMS
11-10
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES PREFLIGHT
11-12
APPROACH AND LANDING
11-13
Transition training
11-14
Transition to Multiengine Airplanes Multiengine flight General Terms and definitions
12-1
PROPELLERS
12-3
FUEL CROSSFEED
12-5
FLIGHT DIRECTORAUTOPILOT YAW DAMPER
12-6
NOSE BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT ANTIICINGDEICING
12-7
Performance and limitations
12-8
Weight and balance
12-10
Normal and crosswind takeoff and climb
12-12
Normal approach and landing
12-14
Shortfield takeoff and climb
12-16
Goaround
12-17
Engine failure after liftoff
12-18
Engine failure during flight
12-21
Engine inoperative approach and landing
12-22
Engine inoperative flight principles
12-23
Stalls
12-25
POWERON STALLS TAKEOFF AND DEPARTURE SPIN AWARENESS
12-26
Engine inoperativeloss of directional control demonstration
12-27
MULTIENGINE TRAINING CONSIDERATIONS
12-31
Transition to Tailwheel Airplanes Tailwheel airplanes Landing gear Taxiing
13-1
Normal takeoff roll
13-2
Crosswind takeoff Shortfield takeoff
13-3
Touchdown Afterlanding roll
13-4
Crosswind afterlanding roll
13-5
Shortfield landing Softfield landing Ground loop
13-6
Transition to Turbopropeller Powered Airplanes General The gas turbine engine
14-1
Turboprop engines
14-2
FIXED SHAFT
14-3
SPLIT SHAFT FREE TURBINE ENGINE
14-5
Reverse thrust and beta range operations
14-7
Turboprop airplane electrical systems
14-8
Operational considerations
14-10
Training considerations
14-12
Transition to Jet Powered Airplanes General Jet engine basics
15-1
Operating the jet engine
15-2
CONTINUOUS IGNITION FUEL HEATERS
15-3
THRUST TO THRUST LEVER RELATIONSHIP VARIATION OF THRUST WITH RPM SLOW ACCELERATION OF THE JET ENGINE
15-4
Absence of propeller effect Absence of propeller slipstream
15-5
Speed margins
15-6
Mach buffet boundaries
15-8
Stalls
15-10
Drag devices
15-13
Thrust reversers
15-14
Pilot sensations in jet flying
15-15
VSPEEDS PRETAKEOFF PROCEDURES
15-16
TAKEOFF ROLL
15-17
INITIAL CLIMB
15-18
LANDING REQUIREMENTS LANDING SPEEDS
15-19
SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES
15-20
APPROACH SPEED
15-21
THE FLARE
15-22
TOUCHDOWN AND ROLLOUT
15-24
Emergency Procedures Emergency situations Emergency landings TYPES OF EMERGENCY LANDINGS PSYCHOLOGICAL HAZARDS
16-1
GENERAL
16-2
TERRAIN SELECTION AIRPLANE CONFIGURATION
16-3
Terrain types CONFINED AREAS TREES FOREST WATER DITCHING AND SNOW
16-4
Engine failure after takeoff singleengine
16-5
Emergency descents
16-6
ENGINE FIRE ELECTRICAL FIRES
16-7
Flight control malfunctionfailure TOTAL FLAP FAILURE ASYMMETRIC SPLIT FLAP
16-8
Landing gear malfunction
16-9
Systems malfunctions electrical system
16-10
Abnormal engine instrument indications
16-11
Inadvertent vfr flight into imc GENERAL
16-12
MAINTAINING AIRPLANE CONTROL ATTITUDE CONTROL
16-14
CLIMBS
16-15
COMBINED MANEUVERS TRANSITION TO VISUAL FLIGHT
16-16
Glossary
G-1
Index
1-1
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

The Federal Aviation Administration is the government organization that regulates and sets procedural standards for the aviation industry.

Bibliographic information