Moral essays, Volume 1

Front Cover
W. Heinemann, ltd., 1928 - Philosophy - 480 pages
6 Reviews
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus, born at Corduba (Cordova) ca. 4 BCE , of a prominent and wealthy family, spent an ailing childhood and youth at Rome in an aunt's care. He became famous in rhetoric, philosophy, money-making, and imperial service. After some disgrace during Claudius' reign he became tutor and then, in 54 CE , advising minister to Nero, some of whose worst misdeeds he did not prevent. Involved (innocently?) in a conspiracy, he killed himself by order in 65. Wealthy, he preached indifference to wealth; evader of pain and death, he preached scorn of both; and there were other contrasts between practice and principle. We have Seneca's philosophical or moral essays (ten of them traditionally called Dialogues)-on providence, steadfastness, the happy life, anger, leisure, tranquility, the brevity of life, gift-giving, forgiveness-and treatises on natural phenomena. Also extant are 124 epistles, in which he writes in a relaxed style about moral and ethical questions, relating them to personal experiences; a skit on the official deification of Claudius, Apocolocyntosis (in Loeb number 15); and nine rhetorical tragedies on ancient Greek themes. Many epistles and all his speeches are lost. The 124 epistles are collected in Volumes IV-VI of the Loeb Classical Library's ten-volume edition of Seneca.

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Review: Moral Essays, Volume III: de Beneficiis

User Review  - John Cairns - Goodreads

Liked it unexpectedly enough, as usual for the historical references, anecdotes of figures and insights into the patina of ordinary ancient life. The conclusion is a bit anti-climactic since it ... Read full review

Review: Moral Essays, Vol 1: de Providentia/de Constantia/de ira/de Clementia

User Review  - Simon - Goodreads

This collection of Seneca's moral essays is less philosophical discourse, more ancient Roman self-help book: simple, uncomplicated, didactic advice for princes, lawmakers, and citizens about how to deal with anger, providence, firmness, etc. A good introduction to some of the ideas of Stoicism. Read full review

Contents

De Providentia
2
De Cokstaxtia
48
De Ira
106

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