Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics

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Cq Press, Dec 1, 2008 - Political Science - 911 pages
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Review: Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics

User Review  - Cortney Durbin - Goodreads

I read this book for a Government class. As far as textbooks go, I'd say it's pretty great. Read full review

Contents

Who Gets What and How?
3
Varieties of Political Systems and the Concept of Citizenship
12
Origins of Democracy in America
19
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Professor Christine Barbour has taught political science at Indiana University in Bloomington for the last ten years. Primarily teaching large sections of Introduction to American Politics, she has become increasingly interested in how teachers of large classes can maximize what their students learn. At Indiana, Professor Barbour has been a Lilly Fellow, working on a project to increase student retention in large introductory courses, and she has worked with the Freshmen Learning Project, a university-wide effort to improve the first year undergraduate experience. She has served on the New York Times College Advisory Board for several years, working with other educators on developing ways to integrate newspaper reading into the undergraduate curriculum. Barbour believes that it is vitally important to counter college students' political apathy, and she is interested in the relationship between active learning techniques and citizenship skills. She has won several teaching awards at Indiana, but the two that mean the most to her were awarded her by students: the Indiana University Student Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Faculty (1995-6) and the Indiana University Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists Brown Derby Award (1997). When not teaching or writing textbooks, Professor Barbour enjoys playing with her five dogs, traveling with her co-author, gardening, cooking (and eating) exotic foods, and playing remarkably bad golf.

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