The History of the Anglo-Saxons, Comprising the History of England from the Earliest Period to the Norman Conquest, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1823 - Anglo-Saxons
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Page 151 - Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity : wherefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. 9 All thy garments smell of myrrh, aloes, and cassia : out of the ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad. 10 Kings...
Page 273 - Merry sang the monks in Ely, When Canute the king was sailing by; " Row, ye Knights, near the land, " And let us hear these monks
Page 196 - ... and for the assessing of scutages, we will cause to be summoned the Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, Earls, and great Barons, individually by our letters. And besides, we will cause to be summoned in general by our Sheriffs and Bailiffs, all those who hold of us in chief...
Page 305 - ... odious man at her pleasure laid ; so as the wretch she might the easiest well command. She with the twisted locks struck the hateful enemy, meditating hate, with the red sword, till she had half cut off his neck; so that he lay in a swoon, drunk and mortally wounded. He was not then dead, not entirely lifeless. She struck then earnest, the woman illustrious in strength, another time the heathen hound, till that his head rolled forth upon the floor. The foul one lay without...
Page 200 - ... time and place. Moreover, the said knights are to have full and sufficient power for themselves and for the community of the aforesaid county, and the said citizens and burgesses for themselves and the communities of the aforesaid cities and boroughs separately, then and there for doing what shall then be ordained according to the common counsel in the premises, so that the aforesaid business shall not remain unfinished in any way for defect of this power.
Page 304 - Baldor of men To fill to them sitting at the feast, Till that to the children of men The dark night approached. Then commanded he, The man so overpowered, The blessed virgin With speed to fetch To his bed-rest, With bracelets laden, With rings adorned. Then quickly hurried The subjected servants, As their elder bade them ; The mailed warriors Of the illustrious lord Stepped to the great place. There they found Judith, Prudent in mind ; And then, firmly, The bannered...
Page 327 - Thy house is not highly built ; it is unhigh and low. When thou art in it, the heelways are low, the side-ways unhigh. The roof is built thy breast full nigh ; so thou shalt in earth dwell full cold, dim, and...
Page 573 - He, though only a shoemaker, was more intelligent than most of his own class ; he had read history more than many, was something of an antiquary, and had stored his memory with a number of interesting popular traditions. I was then about twelve or fourteen years of age ; like him, fond of history and antiquities. He one day showed me a spot on the east side of the...
Page 44 - ... oath to William, he has a cloak or robe reaching nearly to his heels, and buttoned on the breast. They have always belts on. Most of them have shoes, which seem close...
Page 435 - To gild their skins, we have these directions : " Take the red skin and carefully pumice it, and temper it in tepid water, and pour the water on it till it runs off limpid. Stretch it afterwards, and smooth it diligently with clean wood. When it is dry, take the...

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