Seventeenth century men of latitude: forerunners of the new theology (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's sons, 1908 - 199 pages
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Page 142 - But foolish and unlearned questions avoid, knowing that they do gender strifes ; and the servant of the Lord must not strive, but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient, in meekness instructing those that oppose themselves ; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth...
Page 160 - I am of a constitution so general, that it consorts and sympathizeth with all things; I have no antipathy, or rather idiosyncrasy, in diet, humour, air, anything.
Page 13 - These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth.
Page 134 - They also that dwell in the uttermost parts of the earth shall be afraid at thy tokens : thou that makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to praise thee. 9 Thou visitest the earth, and blessest it : thou makest it very plenteous. 10 The river of God...
Page 64 - This presumptuous imposing of the senses of men upon the words of God, the special senses of men upon the general words of God, and laying them upon men's consciences together, under the equal penalty of death and damnation ; this vain conceit that we can speak of the things of God, better than in the words of God: this deifying our own interpretations, and tyrannous enforcing them upon others ; this restraining of the word of God from that latitude and generality, and the understandings of men from...
Page 93 - For honourable age is not that which standeth in length of time, nor that is measured by number of years. But wisdom is the gray hair unto men, and an unspotted life is old age.
Page 135 - Below me trees unnumbered rise, Beautiful in various dyes: The gloomy pine, the poplar blue, The yellow beech, the sable yew, The slender fir, that taper grows, The sturdy oak with broad-spread boughs; And beyond the purple grove, Haunt of Phillis, queen of love! Gaudy as the opening dawn, Lies a long and level lawn On which a dark hill, steep and high, Holds and charms the wandering eye!
Page 65 - Take away these walls of separation, and all will quickly be one ; take away this persecuting, burning, cursing, damning of men, for not subscribing to the words of men as the words of God ; require of Christians only to believe Christ, and to call no man master but him only ; let those leave claiming infallibility that have no title to it ; and let them that in their words disclaim it, disclaim it likewise in their actions.
Page 74 - They declared against superstition on the one hand, and enthusiasm on the other. They loved the constitution of the Church, and the Liturgy, and could well live under them : But they did not think it unlawful to live under another form.
Page 166 - Now for my life, it is a miracle of thirty years, which to relate, were not a history, but a piece of poetry, and would sound to common ears like a fable. For the world, I count it not an inn, but an hospital; and a place not to live, but to die in. The world that I regard is myself; it is the microcosm of my own frame that I cast...

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