Making States Work: State Failure and the Crisis of Governance

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Simon Chesterman, Michael Ignatieff, Ramesh Chandra Thakur
United Nations University Press, Jan 1, 2005 - Political Science - 400 pages
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In the wealth of literature on state failure, little attention has been paid to the questions of what constitutes state success and what enables a state to succeed. This book examines the strategies and tactics of international actors, local political elites, and civil society groups to build or rebuild public institutions before they reach the point of failure —to make the state work.It is frequently assumed that the collapse of state structures leads to a vacuum of political power. This is rarely the case. Basic questions of how best to ensure physical and economic security don't disappear when the institutions of the state break down. Non-state actors in such situations may exercise political power over local populations to provide basic social services from education to medical care. Even where non-state actors exist as parasites, political life goes on.How to engage in such an environment is a problem for policymakers in intergovernmental organizations and donor governments. But it poses far greater difficulties for the embattled state institutions and the populations of such territories. Making States Work examines how these various actors have responded to crises in the legitimacy and viability of state institutions, emphasizing situations in which the state has been salvaged or at least kept afloat.

  

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Contents

Policy responses to state failure
13
The legacy of colonialism
36
Human rights power and the state
59
Regions
77
The Great Lakes and South Central Asia
79
Colombia and the Andean crisis
102
The South Pacific
122
Margins
143
Success in Mozambique?
213
Statebuilding national leadership and relative success in Costa Rica
234
From vulnerability to success The British withdrawal from Singapore
252
Choices
271
Early and early late prevention
273
Making humanitarianism work
296
Transitional justice
318
Transitional administration statebuilding and the United Nations
339

Reviving state legitimacy in Pakistan
145
Disintegration and reconstitution in the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea
167
Afghanistans weak state and strong society
193
Successes
211
Conclusion The future of statebuilding
359
Index
388
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Page ix - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and published by MIT Press Journals.

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About the author (2005)

Simon Chesterman is global professor and director of the New York University School of Law Singapore Program, Singapore. Michael Ignatieff is Carr Professor of Human Rights Practice and the director of human rights policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Ramesh Thakur is a distinguished fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo, Canada. He previously served as senior vice-rector of the United Nations University and assistant secretary general of the United Nations.

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