Tamerlane: A Tragedy in Five Acts (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808 - 61 pages
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Page 4 - I am in presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing or doing anything else, I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure and number, even so perfectly as God made the world, or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea, presently, sometimes with pinches, nips and bobs...
Page 17 - Free and unquestion'd through the wilds of love; While woman, sense and nature's easy fool. If poor, weak, woman swerve from virtue's rule; If, strongly charm'd, she leave the thorny way, And in the softer paths of pleasure stray ; Ruin ensues, reproach and endless shame, And one false step entirely damns her fame ; In vain, with tears the loss she may deplore, In vain, look back on what she was before ; She sets, like stars that fall, to rise no more.
Page 51 - Oh ! my Soul ! For are not thy Transgressions great and numberless? Do they not cover thee, like rising Floods, And press thee like a Weight of Waters down? Does not the Hand of Righteousness afflict thee ; And who shall plead against it? Who shall say To Pow'r Almighty, Thou hast done enough : Or bid his dreadful Rod of Veng'ance, stay?
Page 12 - Age sits with decent grace upon his visage, And worthily becomes his silver locks ; He wears the marks of many years well spent, Of virtue, truth well try'd, and.
Page 15 - And you, the brightest of the stars above, Ye saints that once were women here below, Be witness of the truth, the holy friendship, Which here to this my other self I vow. If I not hold her nearer to my soul, Than every other joy the world can give ; Let poverty, deformity, and shame, Distraction and despair seize me on earth, Let not my faithless ghost have peace hereafter, Nor taste the bliss of your celestial fellowship.
Page 53 - Mercy ! I know it not for I am miserable. I'll give thee Misery, for here She dwells ; This is her House, where the Sun never dawns, The Bird of Night sits screaming o'er the Roof, Grim Spectres sweep along the horrid Gloom, And nought is heard but Waitings and Lamentings.
Page 51 - My guard, too, that observed me still so close, Tire in the task of their inhuman office, And loiter far behind. Alas ! I faint, My spirits fail at once This is the door Of my Alicia Blessed opportunity ! I'll steal a little succour from her goodness, Now while no eye observes me. [She knocks at the Door. Enter a SERVANT.
Page 32 - Has mov'd the people much about the lawfulness Of Edward's issue ? By right grave authority Of learning and religion, plainly proving, A bastard scion never should be grafted Upon a royal stock ; from thence, at full Discoursing on my brother's former contract To Lady Elizabeth Lucy, long before SCENE I.] JANE SHORE.
Page 42 - You heard, the duke's commands to me were absolute. Therefore, my lord, address you to your shrift, With all good speed you may. Summon your courage, And be yourself; for you must die this instant.
Page 51 - Gaze unconcern'd upon the ruin round thee ; As if thou hadst resolv'd to brave thy fate, And triumph in the midst of desolation. " Ha ! see, it swells ; the liquid crystal rises, " It starts, in spite of thee, but I will catch it ; " Nor let the earth be wet with dew so rich.

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