Breathless

Front Cover
Dudley Andrew
Rutgers University Press, 1987 - Performing Arts - 238 pages
4 Reviews
Breathless, a low-budget film, came to be regarded as one of the major accomplishments of the French New Wave cinema of the early sixties. It had a tremendous influence on French filmmakers and on world cinema in general. Beyond its significance in film history, it was also a film of considerable cultural impact. In Breathless, Jean-Luc Godard captured the spirit of a disillusioned generation and fashioned a style, which drew on the past, to parade that disillusionment. In his introduction, Dudley Andrew brilliantly explains what Godard set out to accomplish in Breathless. He illuminates the intertextual and cultural references of the film and the tensions withiin it between tradition and innovation. This volume also features, for the first time in English, the complete and accurate continuity script of Breathless, together with Francois Truffaut's surprisingly detailed original treatment. Also included are an in-depth selection of reviews and criticism in French and English; a brief biographical sketch of the director's life that covers the development of his career, as well as a filmography and selected bibliography. Dudley Andrew is a professor of film studies and comparative literature at Yale University. He is the author of Concepts in Film Theory, Andre Bazin, Flim in the Aura of Art, and other books on film.
  

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Review: Breathless (Rutgers Films in Print)

User Review  - Gabriela Raleva - Goodreads

I was lucky enough to get the chance to actually read the original script of "Breathless". It's a brilliant achievement that is bold and experimental yet simple and pure,with a feeling of being ... Read full review

Review: Breathless (Rutgers Films in Print)

User Review  - Tia - Goodreads

I liked the basis of the story. It just didn't flow for me. Read full review

Contents

Introduction JeanLuc Godard Im Not Out
3
A Biographical
21
Breathless
27
Truffaut 153 Francois Truffaut 1963
177
Interviews with Godard Arts Pierre Marcabru
183
Le Figaro Louis Chauvet 186 Commentaries
189
Marcorelles 189 On Breathless Jean Carta
215
The New Republic Stanley The Graphic in Filmic Writing
224
The Times London 203 Selected Bibliography
239
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Jean-Luc Godard has often been hailed as the most influential and original director of the 1960s. He was born in France, educated as a youth in Switzerland, and returned to France to join the New Wave of filmmakers of the late 1950s and early 1960s, who shattered the polite conventions of postwar French cinema. In 1959 he made his directorial debut with Breathless, which was admired for its innovative techniques, such as the jump cut, and became an immediate international success. Sometimes criticized for his anarchistic use of the medium, Godard made films in the 1960s that are fast-moving, choppy, witty, informal---indeed, a wild collage of contrasting modes. His major films of that decade are Alphaville (1965), La Chinoise (1967), and Weekend (1967). Then, for a number of years, he devoted himself to making polemical leftist films for very small audiences. More recently, Godard had been trying to return to a more broad-based cinema.

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