Democracy and Its Critics (Google eBook)

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Yale University Press, 1991 - 397 pages
3 Reviews
  

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Democracy and its critics

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Dahl defends democracy against various criticisms, including anarchism and its tenet that even democracy is coercive; the normative view that democracy is less desirable than elite rule; and the ... Read full review

Review: Democracy and Its Critics

User Review  - Miriam - Goodreads

A good summary of the arguments around republicanism, democracy, and pluralism. It's timely in that he discusses the dangers inherent to democracy in extreme inequality. Read full review

Contents

To the Democratic CityState
13
Republicanism
24
Anarchism
37
Guardianship
52
A Critique of Guardianship
65
The Idea of Equal Intrinsic Worth
83
Personal Autonomy
97
A Theory of the Democratic Process
106
Process versus Process
176
When Is a People Entitled to the Democratic Process?
193
PART FIVE THE LIMITS AND POSSIBILITIES OF DEMOCRACY
211
Democracy Polyarchy and Participation
225
How Polyarchy Developed in Some Countries
232
Why Polyarchy Developed in Some Countries
244
Is Minority Domination Inevitable?
265
Pluralism Polyarchy and the Common Good
280

The Problem of Inclusion
119
Majority Rule and the Democratic Process
135
Is There a Better Alternative?
153
Process and Substance
163
The Common Good as Process and Substance
299
Democracy in Tomorrows World
311
Sketches for an Advanced Democratic Country
322
Copyright

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Page 17 - The freedom which we enjoy in our government extends also to our ordinary life. There, far from exercising a jealous surveillance over each other, we do not feel called upon to be angry with our neighbor for doing what he likes, or even to indulge in those injurious looks which cannot fail to be offensive, although they inflict no positive penalty.
Page 17 - ... for doing what he likes or even to indulge in those injurious looks which cannot fail to be offensive, although they inflict no positive penalty. But all this ease in our private relations does not make us lawless as citizens.
Page 17 - If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differences; if to social standing, advancement in public life falls to reputation for capacity, class considerations not being allowed to interfere with merit; nor again does poverty bar the way, if a man is able to serve the state, he is not hindered by the obscurity of his condition.

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