A First Course in Computational Physics and Object-Oriented Programming with C++ Hardback with CD-ROM

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 17, 2005 - Computers - 403 pages
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Because of its rich object-oriented features, C++ is rapidly becoming the programming language of choice for science and engineering applications. This text leads beginning and intermediate programmers step-by-step through the difficult aspects of scientific coding, providing a comprehensive survey of object-oriented methods. Numerous aspects of modern programming practice are covered, including object-oriented analysis and design tools, numerical analysis, scientific graphics, software engineering, performance issues and legacy software reuse. Examples and problems are drawn from an extensive range of scientific and engineering applications. The book also includes a full set of free programming and scientific graphics tools that facilitate individual learning and reduce the time required to supervise code development in a classroom setting. This unique text will be invaluable both to students taking a first or second course in computational science and as a reference text for scientific programmers.
  

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Contents

C++ programming basics page
3
Installing and running the DevC++ programming environment
10
Introduction to computer and software architecture
17
Fundamental concepts
25
Writing a first program
37
An introduction to objectoriented analysis
62
C++ objectoriented programming syntax
83
Control logic and iteration
104
The CrankNicholson method
359
Assignments
363
Appendix A Overview of MATLAB
365
Appendix B The Borland C++ Compiler
371
Compiling and running a first program
373
Installing the optional program editor
375
Using the Borland turbo debugger
377
Installing DISLIN
378

Basic function properties
119
Arrays and matrices
140
Input and output streams
158
Numerical error analysis derivatives
175
Rootfinding procedures
191
References
217
Pointers and dynamic memory allocation
227
Advanced memory management
261
The static keyword multiple and virtual inheritance
286
Program optimization in C++
319
Monte Carlo methods
333
Parabolic partial differential equation solvers
354
Direct solution methods
356
A first graphics program
379
The help system
380
The LinuxWindows CommandLine C++ Compiler and Profiler
381
Calling FORTRAN programs from C++
384
Appendix E C++ coding standard
387
Comments
388
Continuation lines
389
Functions
390
Typedefs
391
References and further reading
393
Index
398
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

David Yevick is a Professor of Physics at the University of Waterloo. He has been engaged for 30 years in scientific programming in various fields of optical communications and solid state physics at numerous university and industrial establishments, where he performed pioneering work on the numerical modelling of optical communication devices and systems. Dr Yevick is currently a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Optical Society of America as well as a registered Professional Engineer (Ontario). He has taught scientific and engineering programming for over 20 years and has authored or co-authored over 170 refereed journal articles.

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