German Social Democracy, 1905-1917: The Development of the Great Schism

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Harvard University Press, Jan 1, 1955 - History - 358 pages
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No political parties of present-day Germany are separated by a wider gulf than the two parties of labor, one democratic and reformist, the other totalitarian and socialist-revolutionary. Social Democrats and Communists today face each other as bitter political enemies across the front lines of the cold war; yet they share a common origin in the Social Democratic Party of Imperial Germany. How did they come to go separate ways? By what process did the old party break apart? How did the prewar party prepare the ground for the dissolution of the labor movement in World War I, and for the subsequent extension of Leninism into Germany? To answer these questions is the purpose of my study.

  

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Contents

PART I
1
THE REFORM TACTIC CHALLENGED 19051907
26
Ill THE ELECTIONS OF 1907 AND THE NATIONAL QUES
59
PART II
88
PARTY STRUCTURE AND FACTIONAL POWER
116
THE SWING TO
171
PART IV
197
THE ELECTORAL ALLIANCE OF 1912 AND THE LEFT
224
THE SENSE OF SICKNESS AND THE RECONSOLIDATION
257
PART V
285
THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION
322
INDEX
353
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About the author (1955)

Carl E. Schorske is Professor of History, Princeton University.

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