The Cook's Own Book and Housekeeper's Register: Being Receipts for Cooking of Every Kind of Meat, Fish, and Fowl and Making Every Sort of Soup, Gravy, Pastry, Preserves, and Essences : with a Complete System of Confectionery, Tables for Marketing, a Book of Carving, and Miss Leslie's Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats (Google eBook)

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Munroe and Francis, 1842 - Cookery, American - 337 pages
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Page 134 - ... meanwhile grate some crumbs of bread. The moment the mixture boils up, keeping it still on the fire, put the crumbs in, and let it boil as fast as it can. When of a proper thickness just to drink, take it off.
Page iv - At supper this night he talked of good eating with uncommon satisfaction. " Some people," said he, " have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully ; for I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else.
Page xv - This may give rather more trouble but those u/Jto wish to excel in their art must only consider how the processes of it can be most perfectly performed : a Cook who has a proper pride and pleasure in her business, will make this her maxim on all occasions.
Page 118 - Parboil it ; take off the skin, and then put it down to roast ; baste it with butter, and make a savoury powder of finely minced, or dried and powdered sage, ground black pepper, salt, and some bread-crumbs, rubbed together through a colander...
Page 239 - This branch of cookery requires the most vigilant attention If vegetables are a minute or two too long over the fire, they lose all their beauty and flavour.
Page 7 - Soak them in cold water, wash them well, then put them into plenty of boiling water, with a handful of salt, and let them boil gently till they are tender, which will take an hour and a half, or two hours : the surest way to know when they are done enough, is to draw out a leaf; trim them and drain them on a sieve ; and send up melted butter with them, which some put into small cups, so that each guest may have one.
Page 132 - ... put upon each a bit of bread the size of half a walnut; roll out another layer of paste of the same thickness, cut it as above, wet the edge of the bottom paste, and put on the top, pare them round to the pan, and notch them about a dozen times with the back of the knife, rub them lightly with yolk of egg, bake them in a hot oven about a quarter of an hour : when done, take a thin slice off the top, then with a small knife, or spoon, take out the bread and the inside paste, leaving the outside...
Page 56 - ... half an hour. Add in boiling a bit of alum the size of a pea. Or use beet-root sliced, and some liquor poured over. For mhite, use almonds finely powdered, with a little drop of water : or use cream.
Page 79 - ... rub them well together in a mortar, till they form a smooth paste ; put it through a sieve, and when cold, pound, and mix all together, with the yolks of three eggs boiled hard ; season it with salt, pepper, and curry powder, or cayenne ; add to it the yolks of two raw eggs, rub it well together, and make small balls: ten 172 AN ILL-TOCED BLIND NO ONE CAN WIND.
Page 36 - ... layers, with cake between each layer ; and after it is risen and coloured cover it with paper before your oven is stopped up. It will require three hours to bake properly.

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