Munich and Memory: Architecture, Monuments, and the Legacy of the Third Reich (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Apr 10, 2000 - Architecture - 456 pages
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Munich, notorious in recent history as the capital of the Nazi movement, is the site of Gavriel Rosenfeld's stimulating inquiry into the German collective memory of the Third Reich. Rosenfeld shows, with the aid of a wealth of photographs, how the city's urban form developed after 1945 in direct reflection of its inhabitants' evolving memory of the Second World War and the Nazi dictatorship. In the second half of the twentieth century, the German people's struggle to come to terms with the legacy of Nazism has dramatically shaped nearly all dimensions of their political, social, and cultural life. The area of urban development and the built environment, little explored until now, offers visible evidence of the struggle. By examining the ways in which the people of Munich reconstructed the ruins of their historic buildings, created new works of architecture, dealt with surviving Nazi buildings, and erected new monuments to commemorate the horrors of the recent past, Rosenfeld identifies a spectrum of competing memories of the Nazi experience. Munich s postwar development was the subject of constant controversy, pitting representatives of contending aesthetic and mnemonic positions against one another in the heated battle to shape the city s urban form. Examining the debates between traditionalists, modernists, postmodernists, and critical preservationists, Rosenfeld shows that the memory of Nazism in Munich has never been "repressed" but has rather been defined by constant dissension and evolution. On balance, however, he concludes that Munich came to embody in its urban form a conservative view of the past that was inclined to diminish local responsibility for the Third Reich.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgments
xxi
Introduction
1
RESTORATION OR RENEWAL? 19451958
11
Destruction Reconstruction and Mourning
15
Architecture City Planning and the Memory of Nazism
49
Memory and Urban Denazification
76
Monuments and Memory
107
MODERNISM 19581975
143
POSTMODERNISM 19752000
229
The Postmodern City and the Recontestation of Memory
233
The Architecture of the Third Reich Between Normalization Demolition and Critical Preservation
259
The Return of the Monument
280
Conclusion
306
Appendix
315
Abbreviations
319
Notes
321

Modernism Populist Historic Preservation and the Memory of Nazism
147
Populist Historic Preservation Revisionist Reconstruction and Mourning
175
Nazi Architecture Normalization and Its Discontents
199
The Decline of the Monument
210
Bibliography
399
Index
423
Copyright

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Page 5 - Halbwachs observes that space is 'a reality that endures', thus we can understand how we recapture the past only by understanding how it is preserved by our physical surroundings ([1926] 1950: 84-8). In The Legendary Topography of the Gospels in the Holy Land, Halbwachs (1941) demonstrates the working of memory. He shows how Jews, Romans, Christians and Muslims rewrote the history of Jerusalem by remodelling the space according to their religious...
Page 2 - Coming to terms with the past" does not imply a serious working through of the past, the breaking of its spell through an act of clear consciousness. It suggests, rather, wishing to turn the page and, if possible, wiping it from memory. The attitude that it would be proper for everything to be forgiven and forgotten by those who were wronged is...
Page xix - By ana, ly2ing how Munich's architecture and monuments were erected, demolished, restored, relocated, hidden, and exposed in the postwar period, I have tried to provide a new perspective on the construction and evolution of local collective memory.

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About the author (2000)

Gavriel D. Rosenfeld is Assistant Professor of German and European History at Fairfield University in Connecticut.

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