Brain, Mind and Medicine:: Essays in Eighteenth-Century Neuroscience (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 27, 2007 - History - 389 pages
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There have been no books published on neuroscience in the eighteenth century. Yet this was an important time, with science and medicine in transition. On the one hand, there were wildly speculative theories about the nervous system, many based on Newtonian mechanics and fanciful chemistry. But on the other, this was also a time when empirical research with quantification and experimentation was coming of age. This volume examines the eighteenth-century neuroscience milieu and looks at developments in anatomy, physiology, and medicine that highlight this era, which some people have called the Age of Reason and others the Enlightenment. The book covers such things as the aims of the scientific and medical Enlightenment, how neuroscience adopted electricity as the nerve force, how disorders such as aphasia and hysteria were treated, Mesmerism, and how some of the latest ideas made their way into the culture of the day.
  

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Contents

VII
15
VIII
29
IX
43
X
53
XI
62
XII
63
XIII
67
XIV
85
XXV
209
XXVI
211
XXVII
213
XXVIII
233
XXIX
245
XXX
257
XXXI
271
XXXII
285

XV
99
XVI
115
XVII
125
XVIII
145
XIX
160
XX
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XXI
163
XXII
177
XXIII
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XXIV
201
XXXIII
301
XXXIV
321
XXXV
332
XXXVI
333
XXXVII
335
XXXVIII
345
XXXIX
353
XL
371
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Page 19 - Vast chain of being! which from God began, Natures ethereal, human, angel, man, Beast, bird, fish, insect, what no eye can see, No glass can reach; from Infinite to thee, From thee to nothing.
Page 18 - For it is the opinion of choice virtuosi that the brain is only a crowd of little animals, but with teeth and claws extremely sharp...

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