PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (Google eBook)

Front Cover
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Contents

Colberts policy maintained by Turgot Abandoned by the negotiators
48
Great increase in the quantity of the products of the soil of France
54
Great increase in the value of land resulting from increase in the power
63
Colberts policy in strict accordance with the doctrines of Adam Smith
69
Comparative growth of French and British agriculture
76
Bude character of British products as compared with those of Fraace
84
British system taxes the agricultural communities of the world for
25
That of France looks to their emancipation from taxation Solidarity
90
Enormous waste of power in and consequent poverty of all the countries
101
CHAPTER XXIII
107
Few natural advantages of Denmark Following in the lead of France
270
Decline of Spanish manufactures diminution in the power of association
289
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
308
Prussian tariff having for its object the diversification of the employments
125
Great increase of foreign and domestic commerce consequent upon
131
Increasing steadiness of the societary movement consequent upon
137
Increased respect for the rights of property consequent upon its more
144
Great increase in the quantity and value of agricultural products since
150
Increase in the competition for the purchase of the laborers services
160
Growing individuality among the people with corresponding growth
56
Sweden like Russia follows in the lead of France maintaining
167
Differing in race habits manners and religion France and Germany
174
Early tendencies towards the adoption of the protective policy of Colbert
181
American policy generally in full accordance with the doctrines of
188
Facts here observed correspond precisely with those observed in Britain
191
Phenomena here presented for examination directly the reverse of those
200
CHAPTER XXVII
207
Waste of power resulting from the exhaustion of the soil and consequent
214
Trader profits by instability Remarkable irregularity in the movement
221
CHAPTER XXVIII
228
Forbidding the creation of a domestic market it thus maintains the
233
CHAPTER XXX
293
Definition of price Prices of raw materials rise as we approach
301
CHAPTER XXXI
308
Flowing always towards those countries in which raw materials and fin
382
Raw materials tend to leave the countries in which employments are
314
Money the indispensable instrument of society Of all the instruments
322
Consumption of the metals increases as their value declines That declines
330
Wealth grows with the growth of the power of association That power
336
Error of distinguished economists in supposing that interest is paid
338
The utility of money increases as its circulation becomes more rapid
344
Teachings of economists generally in regard to money directly opposed
353
Decentralization produces diminution therein Man then becomes more
359
Institution of banks of discount Diminish the value of money by
371
Great power of banks for good or evil Banking monopolies like those
369
Movements of the bank from 1797 to 1815
376
Bank Act of Sir Robert Peel Its object that of producing steadiness
382
Currency in use almost a constant quantity Changes in its amount
388
Jointstock banks Unlimited liability of the partners a relic of barba
395
Enormous overtrading of the London banks
402
Other communities of the world prosper in the direct ratio of their inde
409
Those changes due to irregularity in the movements of the one great
415
Its progress since that time Large proportion borne by capital to
420
Steadiness in its own value the great desideratum in a currency Ten
426
Growth of centralization in the last twenty years and consequent dimi
434
Stability of the currency throughout the Union found existing in
440
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
446
Throughout inconsistent with himself His mode of studying the action
449
A medium of circulation the one great need of society Hence the desire
456
Poverty of the countries that follow in the train of Hume and Smith
463
Failure of the British economists to appreciate the services of the pre
470
The more perfect the diversity of employments in each and every country
476

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 454 - The rise in the money price of all commodities, which is in this case peculiar to that country, tends to discourage more or less every sort of industry which is carried on within it, and to enable foreign nations, by furnishing almost all sorts of goods for a smaller quantity of silver than its own workmen can afford to do, to undersell them, not only in the foreign, but even in the home market.
Page 458 - A country that has wherewithal to buy wine, will always get the wine which it has occasion for ; and a country that has wherewithal to buy gold and silver, will never be in want of those metals.
Page 182 - The internal competition which takes place soon does away every thing like monopoly, and, by degrees, reduces the price of the article to the minimum of a reasonable profit on the capital employed. This accords with the reason of the thing, and with experience.
Page 182 - But, though it were true that the immediate and certain effect of regulations controlling the competition of foreign with domestic fabrics, was an increase of price, it is universally true that the contrary is the ultimate effect with every successful manufacture.
Page 83 - The population employed in the cotton factories rises at five o'clock in the morning, works in the mills from six till eight o'clock, and returns home for half an hour or forty minutes to breakfast. This meal generally consists of tea or coffee, with a little bread. Oatmeal porridge is sometimes, but of late rarely used, and chiefly by the men ; but the stimulus of tea is preferred, and especially by the won^en.
Page 209 - HAMILTON'S blood, the voice of impending judgment, calls for a remedy. At this hour, Heaven's high reproof is sounding from Maine to Georgia, and from the shores of the Atlantic to the banks of the Mississippi.
Page 84 - Amongst those who obtain the lower rates of wages, this meal generally consists of boiled potatoes. The mess of potatoes is put into one large dish ; melted lard and butter are poured upon them, and a few pieces of fried fat bacon are sometimes mingled with them, and but seldom a little meat.
Page 198 - Of the twenty millions of dollars annually realized from the sales of the cotton crop of Alabama, nearly all not expended in supporting the producers is reinvested in land and negroes. Thus the white population has decreased, and the slave increased, almost pari passu in several counties of our State. In 1825, Madison county cast about 3,000 votes; now she cannot cast exceeding 2,300. In traversing that county one will discover numerous farmhouses, once the abode of industrious and intelligent freemen,...
Page 179 - ... to consult upon some local improvements ; or,, in another place, the laborers of a village quit their ploughs to deliberate upon the project of a road or a public school. Meetings are called for the sole purpose of declaring their disapprobation of the line of conduct pursued by the government ; while in other assemblies the citizens salute the authorities of the day as the fathers of their country.
Page 179 - The citizen of the United States is taught from infancy to rely upon his own exertions in order to resist the evils and the difficulties of life; he looks upon the social authority with an eye of mistrust and anxiety, and he claims its assistance only when he is unable to do without it.

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