SAT 1600

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Kaplan, Dec 24, 2002 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
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Think a 1600 is out of the question? Think again. Kaplan's SATŪ 1600 provides the extra tactics and advanced practice you need to help you get the absolute maximum score. Using this book with the practice tests and intensive review of Kaplan's bestselling SAT & PSAT guide, you can get the perfect score. TOUGHEST QUESTIONS Practice with "high-octane" questions -- the toughest you'll see on the test -- and get comprehensive explanations, plus tips and techniques for answering them quickly and accurately. HARDEST MATH Target your review with focused approaches to Quantitative Comparisons, Grid-Ins, word problems, and the hardest math concepts you'll see on the SATŪ. STRONGEST STRATEGIES Take apart the most complicated questions with Kaplan's powerful strategies for Critical Reading, Sentence Completions, and Analogies. You'll learn how to get the most points in the least amount of time.

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Contents

The Critical Reading Challenge
3
Strategies for Tough Critical Reading
13
Critical Reading Practice Set and Explanations
37
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

VanEsselstyn has been a writer and editor for Kaplan for five years and she is currently Associate Director of Product Technology.

Multhopp has spent over 10 years helping high school students to ace standardized tests, first as a teacher and then as a course writer.

Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions has helped more than 3 million students achieve their educational and career goals. With 185 centers and over 1,200 classroom locations throughout the U.S. and abroad, Kaplan provides a full range of services, including test-prep courses, admissions consulting, programs for international students, professional licensing preparation, and more.

Michael Palmer was born in New York City in 1943. The recipient of many awards including two grants from the NEA, and a Guggenheim Fellowship, he won the 2001 Shelley Memorial Prize. He is often published in such magazines as Conjunctions, The Chicago Review, Fulcrum, and New American Writing. Palmer's work has been translated into over twenty-five languages. He presently lives in San Francisco, California.