Islamic Fundamentalism

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Abdel Salam Sidahmed, Anoushiravan Ehteshami
Westview Press, 1996 - History - 284 pages
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The phenomenon of political Islam continues to dominate the political and social map of the Arab world, with the increasingly open struggle between ruling elites and Islamists becoming the main source of political instability in many states. This volume offers an in-depth analysis of the rise of Islamic and fundamentalist movements in the Middle East and North Africa. Through detailed case studies, the contributors examine the various manifestations of political Islam, highlighting differences across movements and evaluating the varying circumstances in which they arise. They also assess the influence of such movements on the emerging post–Cold War order in the region and consider questions of a general nature, such as Islamic state theories and the impact of Islamicism on international relations.
  

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Contents

Introduction Abdel Salam Sidahmed and Anoushirawn Ehteshami
1
The Political Discourse of Contemporary Islamist
19
Islamic State Theories and Contemporary Realities
35
Islam and the Secular Logic of the State in the Middle East
51
An Alternative New World Order?
71
The Roots and Future of Islamism in Algeria Claire Spencer
93
The Islamists and the State Under Mubarak
109
Climate of Change in Jordans Islamist Movement
123
Islamist Movements in Historical Palestine lyad Barghouti
163
Ideology and Pragmatism Abdel Salam Sidahmed
179
State and Islamism in Syria Raymond A Hitmebusch
199
Islamism and Tribalism in Yemen Eric Watkins
215
Islamism in Algeria and Iran Mehdi Mozaffari
229
The Case of Rashid alGharmushi
249
About the Book
267
Copyright

Islamic Governance in PostKhomeini Iran
143

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Page 5 - which manifests itself, as a strategy or set of strategies, by which beleaguered believers attempt to preserve their distinctive identity as a people or group. Feeling this identity to be at risk in the contemporary era, they fortify by a selective retrieval of doctrines, beliefs and practices from a sacred past. These retrieved "fundamentals...
Page 32 - In a somewhat arbitrary way we shall call those who belong in this last group "founders of discursivity." They are unique in that they are not just the authors of their own works. They have produced something else: the possibilities and the rules for the formation of other texts. In this sense, they are very different, for example, from a novelist, who is, in fact, nothing more than the author of his own text. Freud is not just the author of The Interpretation of Dreams or Jokes and Their Relation...
Page 27 - ... Unfortunately, true Islam lasted for only a brief period after its inception. First the Umayyads and then the Abbasids inflicted all kinds of damage on Islam. Later the monarchs ruling Iran continued on the same path; they completely distorted Islam and established something quite different in its place. The process was begun by the Umayyads, who changed the nature of government from divine and spiritual to worldly. Their rule was based on Arabism, the principle of promoting the Arabs over all...
Page 257 - Decked out fair to men is the love of lusts — women, children, heaped-up heaps of gold and silver, horses of mark, cattle and tillage. That is the enjoyment of the present life; but God — with Him is the fairest resort. Say: 'Shall I tell you of a better than that?
Page 5 - fundamentals" are refined, modified, and sanctioned in a spirit of shrewd pragmatism: they are to serve as a bulwark against the encroachment of outsiders who threaten to draw the believers into a syncretistic, areligious, or irreligious cultural milieu. Moreover, these fundamentals are accompanied in the new religious portfolio by unprecedented claims and doctrinal innovations. By the strength of these innovations and the new supporting doctrines, the retrieved and updated fundamentals are meant...
Page 69 - Richard P. Mitchell, The Society of the Muslim Brothers (London: Oxford University Press, 1969).
Page 159 - Esposito, The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality?, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
Page 5 - ... Feeling this identity to be at risk in the contemporary era. they fortify it by a selective retrieval of doctrines, beliefs, and practices from a sacred past. These retrieved "fundamentals" are refined, modified, and sanctioned in a spirit of shrewd pragmatism: they are to serve as a bulwark against encroachment of outsiders who threaten to draw the believers into a syncretistic, areligious, or irreligious cultural milieu. Moreover, these fundamentals are accompanied in the new religious portfolio...
Page 203 - Land reform and state agrarian credit and marketing networks deprived the propertied classes of influence and wealth in the villages. Nationalization of industries, which in a few cases touched artisan workshops, was seen as an attack on business and property as a whole. The state takeover of foreign trade, restrictions on imports, and a growing state retail network deprived merchants of business.

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About the author (1996)

Abdel Salam Sidahmed is visiting research associate, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cambridge. Anoushiravan Ehteshami is reader in international relations and director of graduate studies at the Centre for Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, University of Durham. Abdel Salam Sidahmed is visiting research associate, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cambridge. Anoushiravan Ehteshami is reader in international relations and director of graduate studies at the Centre for Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, University of Durham.

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