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Books Books 1 - 10 of 77 on Heat is a very brisk agitation of the insensible parts of the object, which produces....  
" Heat is a very brisk agitation of the insensible parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. "
A History of Electricity: (The Intellectual Rise in Electricity) from ... - Page 417
by Park Benjamin - 1898 - 605 pages
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THE WORKS OF JOHN LOCKE

J. JOHNSON - 1801
...of the object, which produces In us that sensation, from •whence we denominate the object hot; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby, heat is produced ; for •we see that the rubbing of a brass nail...
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Philosophical beauties selected from the works of John Locke

John Locke - 1802
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation, from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby heat is produced ; for we see that the rubbing of a brass nail upon...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1805 - 510 pages
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation, from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby heat is produced ; for we see that the rubbing of a brass nail upon...
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The Works of John Locke, Volume 3

John Locke - Philosophy - 1823
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby heat is produced ; for we see that the rubbing of a brass nail upon...
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An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now added, i. analysis ...

John Locke - 1824
...insensible of the object, which produces in us that sensation, from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby heat is produced ; for we see that the rubbing of a brass nail upon...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: To which are Now First ..., Volume 3

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1828
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but The due temperament of those two opposite qualities is the great instrument of nature that she makes...
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An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now first added, i. an ...

John Locke - 1828
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but On the other side, the utmost degree of cold is the cessation of that motion of the insensible particles,...
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The London encyclopaedia: or, Universal dictionary of science ..., Volume 11

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. Locke. Hops lying undried heats them, and changes their colour. Mortimer. The heati smiths take of...
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Philosophical beauties selected from the works of Jean Locke esq: containing ...

John Locke - 1844 - 258 pages
...parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation, from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion. This appears by the way whereby heat is produced ; for we see that the rubbing of a brass nail upon...
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Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Humanities - 1881
...attractive powers.' The philosopher Locke held the same view, and expressed it elegantly, thus : ' What in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion.' Bacon's definition of heat antedates all this, and is no less explicit. His words are : ' When I say...
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