XX Century Cyclopaedia and Atlas: Biography, History, Art, Science and Gazeteer of the World, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Charles Annandale
Gebbie & Company, 1901 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 494 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 494 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening, and preserving of the laws, Parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Page 494 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time, or in other manner, than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 20 - An accessory after the fact is one who, knowing a felony to have been committed, receives, relieves, comforts, or assists the felon.
Page 494 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament.
Page 26 - Act for the further limitation of the crown, and better securing the rights and liberties of the subject, is and stands limited to the Princess Sophia, Electress of Hanover, and the heirs of her body being Protestants ; hereby utterly renouncing and abjuring any obedience or allegiance unto any other person claiming or pretending a right to the crown of this realm : and...
Page 55 - The ages of male and female are different for different purposes. A male at twelve years old may take the oath of allegiance ; at fourteen is at years of discretion, and therefore may consent or disagree to marriage...
Page 93 - If these writings of the Greeks agree with the book of God, they are useless, and need not be preserved ; if they disagree, they are pernicious, and ought to be destroyed.
Page 102 - Real and personal property of every description may be taken, acquired, held and disposed of by an alien in the same manner in all respects as by a natural-born British subject; and a title to real and personal property of every description may be derived through, from, or in succession to an alien, in the same manner in all respects as through, from, or in succession to a natural-born British subject...
Page 216 - He first taught the principle, " that a body, immersed in a fluid, loses as much in weight as the weight of an equal volume of the fluid...

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