Looking White People in the Eye: Gender, Race, and Culture in Courtrooms and Classrooms

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University of Toronto Press, 1998 - Social Science - 246 pages
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In this book Sherene Razack explores what happens when whites look at non-whites, and in particular at non-white women. Most studies examining this encounter between dominant and subordinate groups focus on how it occurs in films, books, and popular culture. In contrast, Razack addresses how non-white women are viewed, and how they must respond, in classrooms and courtrooms. Examining the discussion of equity issues in the classroom and immigration and sexual violence cases in the courtroom, she argues that non-white women must often present themselves as culturally different instead of oppressed. Seen as victims of their own oppressive culture who must be pitied and rescued by white men and women, non-white women cannot then be seen as subjects. This book makes clear why we must be wary of educational and legal strategies that begin with saving 'Other' women. It offers powerful arguments for why it is important to examine who are the saviours and who are the saved, and what we must do to disrupt these historical relations of power.

  

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
3
The Cold Game of Equality Staring
23
Storytelling for Social Change
36
What Is to Be Gained by Looking White People in the Eye?
56
The Imperial Gaze in Gender
88
The Ableist Gaze and the Politics of Rescue
130
To Essentialize or Not to Essentialize Is This
157
AFTERWORD BY RAMABAI ESPINET
171
BIBLIOGRAPHY
219
PERMISSIONS
239
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Sherene H. Razack is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

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