The Golden Bough

Front Cover
Courier Dover Publications, 2002 - Social Science - 756 pages
19 Reviews
A certain sacred tree was forbidden to the touch, save only for runaway slaves: if the slave could break off a branch — The Golden Bough — he could challenge the tree's attendant priest to mortal combat. If victorious, the slave would replace the priest as King of the Woods — until his lethal defeat by another bearer of The Golden Bough. Sir James George Frazer, an expert in myth and religion, was so intrigued by this tale from classical mythology that he spent more than a quarter-century investigating its genesis. His 1890 study of the cults, rites, and myths of antiquity, The Golden Bough, offers a monumental exploration of these customs and their parallels with early Christianity. A pioneer of social anthropology, Frazer's definitions of such terms as "magic," "religion," and "science" proved highly useful to his successors in the field, and his explications of the ancient legends profoundly influenced generations of prominent psychologists, writers, and poets. This abridgment of his multivolume magnum opus omits footnotes and occasionally condenses text; nevertheless, as the author himself observed, all of the ori ginal work's main principles remain intact, along with ample illustrative examples.
  

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Review: The Golden Bough

User Review  - Charles - Goodreads

If you're going to learn about anything "occult", then, this is where to start. Forget all those other cheap, juvenile occult books, based on a poor and feeble-minded outlook on anything Pagan. Once ... Read full review

Review: The Golden Bough

User Review  - Christopher - Goodreads

So I really shouldn't be marking this as "read", because I only read about half of it in a college Comparative Religions class. I'd like to go back and read it in full. It's a wonderfully dense ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
III
6
IV
7
V
9
VI
11
VII
12
VIII
37
IX
45
CXXIII
377
CXXIV
380
CXXV
381
CXXVI
382
CXXVIII
384
CXXX
385
CXXXII
393
CXXXIV
399

X
48
XII
60
XIV
62
XV
78
XVI
80
XVII
83
XIX
91
XXI
106
XXII
109
XXIII
117
XXIV
120
XXVI
135
XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVII
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XXXIX
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LVII
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
216
LXII
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LXIII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
244
LXXIV
249
LXXV
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LXXVI
257
LXXVII
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LXXVIII
262
LXXX
264
LXXXI
265
LXXXII
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LXXXIII
283
LXXXV
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LXXXVII
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LXXXIX
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XCI
301
XCII
307
XCIII
311
XCIV
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XCV
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XCVI
318
XCVII
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XCVIII
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XCIX
324
CI
327
CIII
329
CV
335
CVII
341
CIX
347
CXI
352
CXIII
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CXV
356
CXVII
362
CXIX
368
CXXII
373
CXXXVI
412
CXXXIX
413
CXL
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CXLI
420
CXLII
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CXLV
425
CXLVI
431
CXLVII
438
CXLVIII
447
CXLIX
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CL
450
CLI
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CLII
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CLIII
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CLIV
457
CLV
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CLVI
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CLVII
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CLVIII
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CLIX
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CLX
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CLXI
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CLXII
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CLXIII
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CLXIV
488
CLXV
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CLXVI
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CLXVIII
499
CLXIX
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CLXX
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CLXXI
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CLXXII
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CLXXIII
518
CLXXIV
532
CLXXVII
535
CLXXVIII
538
CLXXX
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CLXXXI
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CLXXXII
543
CLXXXIII
546
CLXXXV
547
CLXXXVI
551
CLXXXVII
562
CLXXXVIII
563
CLXXXIX
566
CXC
574
CXCI
577
CXCIII
578
CXCIV
583
CXCV
587
CXCVII
592
CC
595
CCI
603
CCII
607
CCIII
609
CCVI
614
CCVII
617
CCVIII
622
CCIX
632
CCX
636
CCXI
638
CCXII
641
CCXIV
643
CCXV
647
CCXVI
650
CCXIX
652
CCXX
658
CCXXII
667
CCXXIV
679
CCXXVII
681
CCXXVIII
683
CCXXIX
691
CCXXX
701
CCXXXII
711
CCXXXIV
715
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About the author (2002)

James George Frazer was a British social anthropologist, folklorist, and classical scholar who taught for most of his life at Trinity College, Cambridge. Greatly influenced by Edward Burnett Tylor's Primitive Culture, published in 1871, he wrote The Golden Bough (1890), a massive reconstruction of the whole of human thought and custom through the successive stages of magic, religion, and science.The Golden Bough is regarded by many today as a much-loved but antiquated relic, but, by making anthropological data and knowledge academically respectable, Frazer made modern comparative anthropology possible.

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