A composer's world: horizons and limitations

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Schott, 2000 - Music - 221 pages
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inch....this work is likely to become a standart work very quickly and is to be recommended to all schools where recorder studies are undertaken inch. (Oliver James,Contact Magazine) A novel and comprehensive approach to transferring from the C to F instrument. 430 music examples include folk and national songs (some in two parts), country dance tunes and excerpts from the standard treble repertoire ofBach, Barsanti, Corelli, Handel, Telemann, etc. An outstanding feature of the book has proved to be Brian Bonsor's brilliantly simple but highly effective practice circles and recognition squares designed to give, in only a few minutes, concentrated practice on the more usual leaps to and from each new note and instant recognition of random notes. Quickly emulating the outstanding success of the descant tutors, these books are very popular even with those who normally use tutors other than the Enjoy the Recorder series.

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Contents

THE PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACH
1
PERCEIVING MUSIC INTELLECTUALLY
14
PERCEIVING MUSIC EMOTIONALLY
23
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Paul Hindemith was a German composer and conductor of great originality. His career began with the study of the violin and the viola, and he held important positions in German ensembles before the Nazi era. Under Hitler's regime, Hindemith experienced difficulties, both artistically and politically. For example, he refused to cease ensemble playing with known Jews. Dr. Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda minister, accused Hindemith of cultural Bolshevism, and his music fell into official desuetude. Unwilling to compromise, Hindemith began accepting engagements abroad. During the late 1930s, he emigrated to the United States, and in 1946 he became a U.S. citizen. Hindemith's musical style is uniquely his own. He sought in each piece to find the style, musical vocabulary, and thematic material most suitable for the intended use of the piece. He was immensely prolific and eclectic as a composer, writer, and teacher.

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