The trees of northeastern America: illustrations from original sketches (Google eBook)

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1890 - Nature - 250 pages
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Page 46 - So the Deacon inquired of the village folk Where he could find the strongest oak, That couldn't be split nor bent nor broke, That was for spokes and floor and sills; He sent for lancewood to make the thills; The crossbars were ash, from the straightest trees, The panels of white-wood, that cuts like cheese, But lasts like iron for things like these; The hubs of logs from the "Settler's...
Page 82 - By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 46 - He sent for lancewood to make the thills; The crossbars were ash, from the straightest trees, The panels of white-wood, that cuts like cheese, But lasts like iron for things like these; The hubs of logs from the "Settler's ellum...
Page 58 - Birch-Tree ! Growing by the rushing river, Tall and stately in the valley ! I a light canoe will build me, Build a swift Cheemaun for sailing, That shall float upon the river, Like a yellow leaf in Autumn, Like a yellow water-lily ! " Lay aside your cloak, O Birch-Tree ! Lay aside your white-skin wrapper, For the Summer-time is coming, And the sun is warm in heaven, And you need no white-skin wrapper...
Page 180 - And the larch, with all its fibres, Shivered in the air of morning, Touched his forehead with its tassels, Said with one long sigh of sorrow, 'Take them all, O Hiawatha!
Page 180 - My canoe to bind together, So to bind the ends together That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me!
Page 207 - The spells were vain ; the hags returned To the queen in sorrowful mood, Crying that witches have no power Where there is rown-tree wood.
Page 26 - Trummying of the temples with floures, boughes, and garlondes, was taken of the heathen people, whiche decked their idols and houses with suche array.
Page 255 - We believe this is the most complete and handsome volume of its kind, and on account of its completeness and the readiness with which it imparts information that everybody needs and few possess, it is invaluable.

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