Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Volume 34 (Google eBook)

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Royal Meteorological Society, 1908 - Meteorology
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Phenological report contained in v. 3-71, issued as a supplement to v. 73-74, missing from vols. 56-58, 60-62.
  

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Page 144 - Here here's his place, where meteors shoot, clouds form, Lightnings are loosened, Stars come and go! let joy break with the storm Peace let the dew send! Lofty designs must close in like effects: Loftily lying, Leave him still loftier than the world suspects, Living and dying.
Page 224 - ... $2.00. This volume is intended for persons who have not had special training in the technicalities of climatology. Climate covers a wholly different field from that included in the meteorological text-books. It handles broad questions of climate in a way which has not been attempted in a single volume. The needs of the teacher and student have been kept constantly in mind. 20. Heredity. By J. ARTHUR THOMSON, MA, Professor of Natural History in the University of Aberdeen ; Author of " The Science...
Page 301 - Marks for the best discussion of the meteorological results obtained in the International Kite and Balloon Ascents. The conditions are : 1. The judges are free to divide the prize. 2. Persons of any nationality may take part in the competition. 3. The communications may be in German, English, or French, and must be well and legibly written on one side of the paper only, and further have a Motto attached. They must be accompanied by a sealed envelope, bearing on the outside the same Motto, and...
Page 155 - Meteorological Society be communicated to the President and Council of the Institution of Civil Engineers for having granted the Society free permission to hold its Meetings in the rooma of the Institution.
Page 213 - METEOROLOGY." [This Lecture will be printed in the next number of the Quarterly Journal.'] Dr. WN SHAW said that it was his privilege to propose a vote of thanks to Dr. Hellmann for his extremely able and interesting lecture. He felt more or less at home in proposing this vote of thanks, because Dr. Hellmann, as a Director of the Prussian Meteorological Institute, was a colleague of his as Director of a .Meteorological Office. He was not betraying any great secret in saying, that the Director of...
Page 90 - ... Toll is taken all along the banks of industrial streams for raising steam and carrying on the multitudinous processes of manufacture. There is sometimes anxiety as to whether the waterways can be kept sufficiently supplied to float the water-borne traffic or to fight the silting action of the tides, and there is growing alarm as to the possibility of fish traversing the depleted and polluted streams to reach their spawning beds. Of recent years the value of the water-power which may be generated...
Page 94 - ... house which was brought in and weighed, was found to be only sixtyfour Ibs., though it measured three feet long and six and a half feet in circumference. The centre is not quite hollow, but in all there is a deep conical cavity at each end, and in many there is a small opening through which one can see, and by placing the head in this cavity in the bright sun, the concentric structure of the cylinder is quite apparent. So far as I am yet informed, they do not occur in any of the adjoining parishes,...
Page 91 - From the high ground the rivers seek the plains, carrying off the excess of rainfall into the less liberally watered districts. The Dee, the Severn, the Wye, and the Usk restore to England part of the rains which the Welsh mountains have abstracted as the air passed over them. The high rainfall of the whole Pennine district, sometimes by circuitous routes across the comparatively dry plains of the east, swells the volume of fresh water that pours into the Humber. The Thames itself receives the comparatively...
Page 221 - He points out that the time of flowering in the spring of a given variety of fruit is dependent upon a number of causes or conditions, chief among them being, first, the number of positive temperature units received in the spring preparatory to flowering ; second, the stage of development of the flower-buds as dependent upon the climatic conditions of the summer and...
Page 90 - Of recent years the value of the water-power which may be generated in the lonely and lofty places amongst the western heights of Great Britain, where the rainfall is large and unfailing, has been recognised ; and chemical works for the production in electric furnaces of what a few years ago were rare substances are becoming familiar features in Wales and the Highlands. In Ireland, too, the rainfall is an unrecognised source of wealth which as yet has not been drawn upon to any appreciable extent....

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