University oars, a critical enquiry into the after health of the men who rowed in the Oxford and Cambridge boat-race, from 1829 to 1869, based on the personal experience of the rowers themselves (Google eBook)

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1873
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Page 397 - AND WITHAM. — A System of Figure Skating. Being the Theory and Practice of the Art as developed in England, with a Glance at its Origin and History.
Page 342 - Tsis, who meet For the Derby of boating, our fete of the oar. "Off jackets !" — each oarsman springs light to his seat, And we veterans, while ever more fierce beats the rain, Scan well the light form of each hardy athlete, And live the bright days of our youth once again. A fig for the weather ! they're off! swing together ! Tho...
Page 397 - ... followed by a chapter giving Definitions of Terms. Then follow ample directions to young cricketers as to the proper style in which to play, information being given on every detail connected with the game. The book contains a number of useful illustrations, including a specimen scoring-sheet. " We can heartily recommend to all cricketers, old and young, this excellent Guide to the Cricket-ground.-"—Sporting Life.
Page 343 - No dodges we own but strength, courage, and science ; Gold rules not the fate of our Isthmian games ; In brutes — tho' the noblest — we place no reliance ; Our racers are men, and our turf is the Thames. The sons of St. Dennis in praise of their tennis, Of chases and volleys, may brag to their fill ; To the northward of Stirling, of golf and of curling, Let the chiels wi' no trousers crack on as they will.
Page 302 - psychrolutes," bathing in winter in all states of the river. And my advice to all young men is, in two sentences, " Be temperate in all things," and " Incumbite remis " [" Bend to your oars ! "] * Towards the end of his undergraduate life, he once observed, on returning home, that his parents had put down their carriage. Asking the reason, he learnt that the expense of keeping two sons at Cambridge and two at Eton was beyond their means ; and from...
Page 398 - The work before us is one which should be in the hands of every schoolmaster and schoolmistress. It is marked in every line by good sense, and is so clearly written that no one can mistake its rules."— LANCET.
Page 342 - The wood sways and rocks in the fierce Equinox, The old heathen war-god bears rule in the sky, Aslant down the street drives the pitiless sleet, At the height of the house-tops the cloud-rack spins by. Old Boreas may bluster, but gaily we'll muster, And crowd every nook on bridge, steamboat, and shore, With cheering to greet Cam and Tsis, who meet For the Derby of boating, our fe'te of the oar. "Off jackets I...
Page 190 - Fowell of Pembroke, and Chaplain at Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny, where he died in 1857. The following passage is from 'Extracts from the Published Memoir of the Rev. HS Polehampton : ' — ' Henry Stedman Polehampton was always of a peculiarly fearless honest nature, much liked by his companions, and attached to those manly sports of swimming, boating, and cricketing, for which Eton is famed; he became a stout swimmer, a good "oar...
Page 113 - ... or six stone distributed over his body being composed wholly of adipose tissue. He is thus as completely enveloped in blubber as though he were a whale or a seal. His muscles being heavily weighted, his powers of locomotion are necessarily limited ,' and, handicapped in this manner, it is no easy task for him to drag his unwieldy frame on some sweltering 12th of August over the 'trying inequalities of a Highland moor.
Page 191 - The uniform success of his College boat during his captaincy proved at once his energy and his influence over men. In 1846 he was chosen to row in the University boat in the match with Cambridge ; the latter being the winners of a well-contested race.

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