Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future

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Tachyon Publications, 2008 - Law - 213 pages
26 Reviews

Hailed by Bruce Sterling as “a political activist, gizmo freak, junk collector, programmer, entrepreneur, and all-around Renaissance geek,” the Internet’s favorite high-tech culture maven is celebrated with the first collection of his infamous articles, essays, and polemics. Irreverently championing free speech and universal access to information—even if it's just a free download of the newest Britney Spears MP3—he leads off with a mutinous talk given at Microsoft on digital rights management, insisting that they stop treating their customers as criminals. Readers will discover how America chose Happy Meal toys over copyright, why Facebook is taking a faceplant, how the Internet is basically just a giant Xerox machine, why Wikipedia is a poor cousin of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, and how to enjoy free e-books. Practicing what he preaches, all of the author's books, including this one, are simultaneously released in print and on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their reuse and sharing. He argues persuasively that this practice has considerably increased his sales by enlisting readers to promote his work. Accessible to geeks and nontechies alike, this is a timely collection from an author who effortlessly surfs the zeitgeist while always generating his own wave.

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Interesting essays on the state of the media. I'm not sure anyone really knows where it is all heading, but the established companies are trying to hang on to their income streams.

Review: Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future

User Review  - Tyler - Goodreads

An excellent collection of Doctorow's philosophy of technology and culture. Particularly helpful for understanding DRM and publishing. As always with CD, the writing is clear and technical without being pedantic; the chapters originally delivered as presentations were my favorite stylistically. Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
27
III
39
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

Cory Doctorow is a science-fiction novelist, blogger, and technology activist whom Entertainment Weekly called “the William Gibson of his generation.” He is the author of the best-sellers Little Brother, Makers, Pirate Cinema, and Homeland and the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing. Doctorow is a contributor to the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, Locus, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was the director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy standards, and treaties.

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