JOURNAL OF AN EXPEDITION TO EXPLORE THE COURSE AND TERMINATION OF THE NIGER: WITH A NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE DOWN THAT RIVER TO ITS TERMINATION (Google eBook)

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1854
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Page 24 - I am accustomed to hardships. I have known both hunger and nakedness to the utmost extremity of human suffering. I have known what it is to have food given me as charity to a madman ; and I have at times been obliged to shelter myself under the miseries of that character, to avoid a heavier calamity. My distresses have been greater than I have ever owned, or ever will own to any man. Such evils are terrible to bear ; but they never yet had power to turn me from my purpose.
Page 30 - My dear friend, Mr Anderson, and likewise Mr Scott, are both dead ; but though all the Europeans who are with me should die, and though I were myself half dead, I would still persevere ; and if I could not succeed in the object of my journey, I would at last die on the Niger.
Page 110 - It is the custom here, when a governor dies, for two of his favourite wives to quit the world on the same day, in order that he may have a little pleasant, social company in a future state...
Page 269 - ... best, and we believe the only manufactory of the kind in this part of the country; besides which they make very neat saddles, country cloth, &c. ; and they grow indigo, tobacco, onions, wheat, and different kinds of grain ; and vast quantities of rice, of superior quality. The inhabitants have likewise horses, bullocks,, goats, &c., but notwithstanding their industry and the advantages which they enjoy, they are very poorly clad, have little money, and are perpetually complaining of their bad...
Page 269 - ... accustomed tribute, and partly from the harsh measures adopted by the sultan to compel them to do so. T,he city of Yaoorie is of prodigious extent, and is supposed to be as populous as any other in the whole continent, or at least that part of it which is visited by the trading Arabs. Its wall is high and very excellent, though made of clay alone, and may be between twenty and thirty miles in circuit ; and it has eight vast entrance-gates or doors, which are well fortified after the manner of...
Page 216 - ... bells, the animated looks, and warlike bearing of their riders, presented one of the most extraordinary and pleasing sights that we have ever witnessed. The race was well contested, and terminated only by the horses being fatigued, and out of breath; but though every one was emulous to outstrip his companion, honour and fame were the only reward of the competitors.
Page 39 - You are to take every opportunity of sending down by the coast a brief abstract of your proceedings and observations, furnishing the bearer with a note, setting forth the reward he is to have for his trouble, and requesting any English person, to whom it is presented, to pay that reward on the faith that it will be repaid him by the British Government. For the performance of this service, you are furnished with all the articles which you have required for your personal convenience, during your journey,...
Page 114 - A deputation is expected from the village to-morrow, when, no doubt, after a good deal of crying and condoling, and talking and persuading, the matter will eventually be decided against the old lady. It is understood that she has bribed a few of the most opulent and influential inhabitants of Jenna with large sums of money, to induce them to overlook her dereliction from the path of duty, and that by their representations she has obtained the tacit consent of the King of Katunga to live out the full...
Page 37 - Sir, "I am directed by secretary Sir George Murray to acquaint you, that he has deemed it expedient to accept the offer, which you have made, to proceed to Africa, accompanied by your brother, for the purpose of ascertaining the course of the great river, which was crossed by the late Captain Clapperton on his journey to...
Page 96 - They were enlightened, however, at times by the appearance of glow-worms, which were so luminous that one could almost see to read by their golden splendour ; and sometimes by the moonbeams which trembled upon the leaves and branches of the trees. A fragrance also was exhaled from the forest, more odoriferous than the perfume of...

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