Formulaic Language and the Lexicon

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 10, 2005 - Foreign Language Study - 348 pages
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A considerable proportion of our everyday language is "formulaic". It is predictable in form and idiomatic--apparently stored in fixed or semi-fixed chunks. This book explores the nature and purposes of formulaic language, and looks for patterns across the research findings from the fields of discourse analysis, first language acquisition, language pathology and applied linguistics. It gradually builds up a unified description and explanation of formulaic language as a linguistic solution to a larger, non-linguistic, problem, the promotion of self.
  

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Contents

PART II A REFERENCE POINT
67
PART III FORMULAIC SEQUENCES IN FIRST LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
103
A Model
128
PART IV FORMULAIC SEQUENCES IN A SECOND LANGUAGE
141
PART V FORMULAIC SEQUENCES IN LANGUAGE LOSS
215
PART VI AN INTEGRATED MODEL
259
Notes
283
References
301
Index
327
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About the author (2005)

Alison Wray is a Research Professor of Language and Communication at Cardiff University. Her research centres on the modelling of lexical storage and processing, particularly in relation to formulaic phrases, and it has been applied to language learning, evolution of language and language disability. Her two monographs "Formulaic Language and the Lexicon "(Cambridge University Press, 2002) and "Formulaic Language: Pushing the Boundaries" (Oxford University Press, 2008) are internationally acclaimed. She has a longstanding commitment to researcher training, including the developing of academic expertise.

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