Irish legends and lyrics, with poems of the imagination and fancy, Volumes 1-2 (Google eBook)

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McGlashan & Gill, 1858 - 455 pages
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Page 207 - The cemetery is an open space among the ruins, covered in winter with violets and daisies. It might make one in love with death, to think that one should be buried in so sweet a place.
Page 3 - Laboureth ever and ever with hope through the morning of life, Winning home and its darling divinities love-worshipped children and wife. Round swings the hammer of industry, quickly the sharp chisel rings, And the heart of the toiler has throbbings that stir not the bosom oi...
Page 27 - AH ! my heart is weary waiting, Waiting for the May Waiting for the pleasant rambles, Where the fragrant hawthorn brambles, With the woodbine alternating, Scent the dewy way : Ah ! my heart is weary waiting, Waiting for the May.
Page 235 - Rocks) the receptacle of a deale of scales thereon yearly slaughtered. These rocks sometimes appear to be a great city far off, full of houses, castles, towers, and chimneys ; sometimes full of blazing flames, smoak, and people running to and fro.
Page 242 - His expanded wings and tail, glistening with white, and the buoyant gaiety of his action, arresting the eye, as his song most irresistibly does the ear. He sweeps round with enthusiastic ecstasy he mounts and descends as his song swells or dies away ; and, as my friend Mr.
Page 111 - o'er the mountains are shining, With the hue of their heather, as sunlight advances, Like purple flags furled round the staffs of the lances ! Sweetest of vales is the Vale of Shanganah ! Greenest of vales is the Vale of Shanganah ! No lands far away by the calm Susquehannah, So tranquil and fair as the Vale of Shanganah...
Page 218 - HAIL to thee, blithe spirit ! Bird thou never wert, That from heaven, or near it, Pourest thy full heart In profuse strains of unpremeditated art Higher still and higher From the earth thou springest Like a cloud of fire; The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.
Page 187 - We breathed aloud the Christian's filial prayer, Which makes us brothers even with the Lord ; " Our Father," cried we, in the midnight air, " In heaven and earth be thy great name adored; May thy bright kingdom, where the angels are, Replace this fleeting world, so dark and dim.
Page 118 - It was all but a moment, her radiant existence, Her presence, her absence, all crowded on me; But time has not ages and earth has not distance . To sever, sweet vision, my spirit from thee! '.'.. Again am I straying where children are playing, Bright is the sunshine and balmy the air, Mountains are heathy, and there do I see thee, Sweet fawn of the valley, young Kate of Kenmare!
Page 113 - THE pillar towers of Ireland, how wondrously they stand By the lakes and rushing rivers through the valleys of our land ; In mystic file, through the isle, they Lift their heads sublime, These gray old pillar temples, these conquerors of time...

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