The House of the Wolfings: A Book That Influenced J. R. R. Tolkien

Front Cover
Inkling Books, Nov 1, 2003 - Fiction - 162 pages
10 Reviews
J. R. R. Tolkien was inspired in the writing of The Lord of the Rings by this tale of a magical coat of mail and the temptation to use its protection in a war between the Rohan-like Wolfings and the enslaving armies of Rome.
  

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Review: The House of the Wolfings

User Review  - Luke Sineath - Goodreads

Hard to review. I read this because of Morris' massive influence on Tolkien, and while it was ok, his writing, at least in this book, does not come close to Tolkien's greatness. I enjoyed the archaic ... Read full review

Review: The House of the Wolfings

User Review  - Randy - Goodreads

I started reading Ivanhoe and was put off by the archaic language. This book is more readable, and directly connected to the modern fantasy genre. It was quite good. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Foreword
7
Introduction
13
The Dwellings of Midmark
15
The Flitting of the WarArrow
19
Thiodolf Talketh with the WoodSun
23
The House Fareth to the War
30
Concerning the HallSun
35
They Talk on the Way to the FolkThing
43
How the DwarfWrought Hauberk Was Brought Away from the Hall of the Daylings
86
The WoodSun Speaketh with Thiodolf
88
Tidings Brought to the WainBurg
94
19 Those Messengers Come to Thiodolf
98
Otter and his Folk Come into Midmark
104
They Bicker about the Ford
110
Otter Falls on Against his Wall
113
Thiodolf Meeteth the Romans in the Wolfing Meadow
118

They Gather to the FolkMote
49
The Folkmote of the Markmen
55
The Ancient Man of the Daylings
65
That Carline Cometh to the Roof of the Wolfings
67
The HallSun Speaketh
69
Tidings of the Battle in Mirkwood
71
The HallSun Saith Another Word
75
The HallSun Is Careful Concerning the Passes of the Wood
77
They Hear Tell of the Battle on the Ridge
80
The Goths Are Overthrown by the Romans
122
The Host of the Markmen Cometh into the Wildwood
125
Thiodolf Talketh with the Woodsun
130
They Wend to the Morning Battle
137
Of the Storm of Dawning
141
Of Thiodolfs Storm
146
Thiodolf Is Borne Out of the Hall and Otter Is Laid Beside Him
153
Old Asmund Speaketh Over the Wardukes The Dead Are Laid in Mound
158
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About the author (2003)

Morris was the Victorian Age's model of the Renaissance man. Arrested in 1885 for preaching socialism on a London street corner (he was head of the Hammersmith Socialist League and editor of its paper, The Commonweal, at the time), he was called before a magistrate and asked for identification. He modestly described himself upon publication (1868--70) as "Author of "The Earthly Paradise,' pretty well known, I think, throughout Europe." He might have added that he was also the head of Morris and Company, makers of fine furniture, carpets, wallpapers, stained glass, and other crafts; founder of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings; and founder, as well as chief designer, for the Kelmscott Press, which set a standard for fine book design that has carried through to the present. His connection to design is significant. Morris and Company, for example, did much to revolutionize the art of house decoration and furniture in England. Morris's literary productions spanned the spectrum of styles and subjects. He began under the influence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti with a Pre-Raphaelite volume called The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems (1858); he turned to narrative verse, first in the pastoral mode ("The Earthly Paradise") and then under the influence of the Scandinavian sagas ("Sigurd the Volsung"). After "Sigurd," his masterpiece, Morris devoted himself for a time exclusively to social and political affairs, becoming known as a master of the public address; then, during the last decade of his life, he fused these two concerns in a series of socialist romances, the most famous of which is News from Nowhere (1891).

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