Lives of great and celebrated characters of all ages and countries: comprising heroes, conquerors, jugglers and other curiosities of human nature (Google eBook)

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Leary, Getz & co., 1860 - 767 pages
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Page 298 - This was the noblest Roman of them all: All the conspirators save only he Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 507 - I had looked into a great many books, which were not commonly known at the Universities, where they seldom read any books but what are put into their hands by their tutors; so that when I came to Oxford, Dr. Adams, now master of Pembroke College, told me, I was the best qualified for the University that he had ever known come there.
Page 526 - I went over to France with a view of prosecuting my studies in a country retreat ; and I there laid that plan of life which I have steadily and successfully pursued. I resolved to make a very rigid frugality supply my deficiency of fortune, to maintain unimpaired my independency, and to regard every object as contemptible, except the improvement of my talents in literature.
Page 188 - Son William, if you and your friends keep to your plain way of preaching, and keep to your plain way of living, you will make an end of the priests to the end of the world.
Page 517 - The doctor, having first asked him if he could bear the whole truth, which way soever it might lead, and being answered that he could, declared that, in his opinion, he could not recover without a miracle. " Then," said Johnson, " I will take no more physic, not even my opiates ; for I have prayed that I may render up my soul to God unclouded."^) In this resolution he persevered, and, at the same time, used only the weakest kinds of sustenance.
Page 627 - Dryden, whose education was more scholastic, and who before he became an author had been allowed more time for study, with better means of information. His mind has a larger range, and he collects...
Page 140 - HERE lies old Hobson : Death hath broke his girt, And here, alas! hath laid him in the dirt; Or else, the ways being foul, twenty to one He's here stuck in a slough and overthrown.
Page 194 - Let us take the Road. Hark! I hear the sound of Coaches! The hour of Attack approaches, To your Arms, brave Boys, and load. See the Ball I hold! Let the Chymists toil like Asses, Our fire their fire surpasses, And turns all our Lead to Gold.
Page 582 - ... as it were suspended in the air, a visible representation of the Lord Jesus Christ upon the cross, surrounded on all sides with a glory; and was impressed as if a voice, or something equivalent to a voice, had come to him, to this effect (for he was not confident as to the words), "Oh, sinner! did I suffer this for thee, and are these thy returns?
Page 140 - But lately finding him so long at home, And thinking now his journey's end was come, And that he had ta'en up his latest Inn, In the kind office of a...

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