Odds and ends from an old drawer (Google eBook)

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G. Routledge & Co., 1855 - 120 pages
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Page 94 - To church, where I found that my coming in a perriwigg did not prove so strange as I was afraid it would, for I thought that all the church would presently have cast their eyes all upon me, but I found no such thing.2 9th.
Page 78 - The fond lover again, as he kisses some treasured lock, will doubtless be disgusted when we tell him, that, apart from the sentiment, he might as well impress his fervent lips upon a pig's pettitoe, or even upon the famous Knob Kerry, made out of the horn of a rhinoceros, carried by the king of hunters, Mr. Roualleyn Gordon Gumming. The hair, anatomically considered, is composed of three parts — the follicle or tubular depression in the skin into which the hair is inserted — the bulb or root...
Page 77 - Europe is the neutral tint, which has naturally resulted from the admixture of the flaxen-haired races of the north with the old southern population. If we open a wider map we only receive ampler proof that race alone determines the colour of the hair. Thus, taking the parallel of 51 north, and following it as it runs like a necklace round the world, we find a dozen nations threaded upon it like so many parti-coloured beads. The European portion of the necklace is light-haired — whereas the Tartars,...
Page 87 - Twas cut in town — and in this very room. Oily. Amazement ! — but I now remember well. We had an awkward new provincial hand, A fellow from the country. Sir, he did More damage to my business in a week Than all my skill can in a year repair. He must have cut your hair. Jones (looking at him). No — 'twas yourself. Oily. Myself! Impossible!
Page 34 - Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range, Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change. Thro...
Page 98 - ... artistic arrangement, pomatumed, powdered, curled, and clubbed, these poor wretches were forced to sleep as well as they could on their faces! Such was the rigidity with which certain modes were enforced in the army about this period, that there was kept in the adjutant's office of each regiment a pattern of the correct curls, to which the barber could refer.
Page 96 - From the altitude of the head-dresses in 1778 it was found that they intercepted the view of spectators in the rear of them at the Opera, and the director was obliged to refuse admittance to the amphitheatre to those persons who wore such immoderate coiffures — a proceeding which reminds us of the joke of Jack Reeve, who, whilst manager of the Adelphi, posted a notice that, in consequence of the crowded state of the house, gentlemen frequenting the pit must shave off their whiskers ! Such was the...
Page 85 - ... principally because we had used up all the beavers in the Hudson's Bay Company's territories. The adoption of silk hats has, however, given them time, it seems, to replenish the breed. This fact affords a singular instance of the influence of fashion upon the animals of a remote continent. It would be more singular still if the silk-hat theory of baldness has any truth in it, as it would then turn out that we were sacrificing our own natural nap in order that the beaver might recover his. Without...
Page 82 - Light hair all comes from Germany, where it is collected by a company of Dutch farmers, who come over for orders once a year. It would appear that either the fashion or the necessity of England has, within a recent period, completely altered the relative demands from the two countries. Forty years ago, according to one of the first in the trade, the light German hair alone was called for, and he almost raved about a peculiar golden tint which was supremely prized, and which his father used to keep...
Page 94 - I, by and by, went abroad, after I had caused all my maids to look upon it ; and they conclude it do become me ; though Jane •was mightily troubled for my parting of my own haire, and so was Besse.

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