When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

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Knopf, 1996 - Social Science - 322 pages
17 Reviews
Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work.
"Wilson is the keenest liberal analyst of the most perplexing of all American problems...[This book is] more ambitious and more accessible than anything he has done before".--The New Yorker

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Review: When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

User Review  - Miriam - Goodreads

This book was written in 1996 and it is amazing how little has changed in terms of the economic prospects of the unskilled and even of the middle class. It remains to be seen whether better health ... Read full review

Review: When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor

User Review  - John Sibley - Goodreads

A brilliant expose on how structural and institutional capitalism ( and racism)is far more important in determining public policy for the poor than cultural perceptions. Read full review

Contents

From Institutional to Jobless Ghettos
3
Societal Changes and Vulnerable
25
GhettoRelated Behavior and the Structure
51
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

William Julius Wilson, an American sociologist, received his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1966 and teaches at the University of Chicago. His scholarly work, written from both historical and sociological perspectives, has concentrated on the condition of African Americans living in inner cities, especially the underclass. He stresses urban divisions separating the middle class from the poor.

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