New elegant extracts; a selection from the most eminent British poets and poetical translators, by R.A. Davenport (Google eBook)

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1823
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Page 281 - Come, my Corinna, come; and, coming mark How each field turns a street, each street a park Made green and trimm'd with trees; see how Devotion gives each house a bough Or branch: each porch, each door, ere this An ark, a tabernacle is, Made up of white-thorn, neatly interwove; As if here were those cooler shades of love. Can such delights be in the street And open fields and we not see 't? Come, we'll abroad; and let's obey The proclamation made for May: And sin no more, as we have done, by staying;...
Page 312 - That sometimes from the savage den, And sometimes from the darksome shade, And sometimes starting up at once In green and sunny glade There came and looked him in the face An angel beautiful and bright; And that he knew it was a Fiend, This miserable Knight!
Page 283 - Come, let us go while we are in our prime; And take the harmless folly of the time. We shall grow old apace, and die Before we know our liberty. Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun; And, as a vapour or a drop of rain, Once lost, can ne'er be found again, So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drowned with us in endless night. Then while time serves, and we are but decaying, Come, my Corinna, come, let's go...
Page 49 - Sunshine glimmers with green light. |Oh ! 'tis a quiet spirit-healing nook ! Which all, methinks, would love; but chiefly he, The humble man, who, in his youthful years, Knew just so much of folly, as had made His early manhood more securely wise...
Page 189 - You violets that first appear, By your pure purple mantles known Like the proud virgins of the year, As if the spring were all your own; What are you when the rose is blown? 39 So, when my mistress shall be seen In form and beauty of her mind, By virtue first, then choice, a Queen, Tell me, if she were not design'd Th' eclipse and glory of her kind?
Page 188 - You meaner beauties of the night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light, You common people of the skies; What are you when the moon shall rise?
Page 311 - I played a soft and doleful air, I sang an old and moving story An old rude song, that suited well That ruin wild and hoary. She listened with a flitting blush, With downcast eyes and modest grace ; For well she knew I could not choose But gaze upon her face. I told her of the knight that wore Upon his shield a burning brand ; And that for ten long years he wooed The Lady of the Land.
Page 313 - The music and the doleful tale, The rich and balmy eve; And hopes, and fears that kindle hope, An undistinguishable throng, And gentle wishes long subdued, Subdued and cherished long! She wept with pity and delight, She blushed with love and virgin shame; And like the murmur of a dream, I heard her breathe my name. Her bosom heaved she stepped aside, As conscious of my look she stept Then suddenly, with timorous eye She fled to me and wept.
Page 281 - Besides, the childhood of the day has kept, Against you come, some orient pearls unwept : Come, and receive them while the light Hangs on the dew-locks of the night : And Titan on the eastern hill Retires himself, or else stands still Till you come forth. Wash, dress, be brief in praying Few beads are best, when once we go a Maying.
Page 312 - All impulses of soul and sense Had thrill'd my guileless Genevieve; The music and the doleful tale, The rich and balmy eve; And hopes, and fears that kindle hope, An undistinguishable throng, And gentle wishes long subdued, Subdued and cherish'd long!

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