Pride and Prejudice (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
71 Reviews
"Pride and Prejudice" is the story of Elizabeth Bennet and her four sisters who are all unmarried. When the wealthy young gentleman, Charles Bingley, rents the nearby manor of Netherfield Park the opportunity to find a husband presents itself. While attending a ball the Bennets meet Mr. Bingley and his friend Mr. Darcy for the first time. Mr. Bingley and Jane, Elizabeth's older sister, form a quick friendship, while Mr. Darcy shows little interest in Elizabeth by refusing to dance with her. However in subsequent weeks Mr. Darcy finds himself increasingly attracted to Elizabeth and as the novel progresses the reader is made to ask will a romance between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth come to be. Discover for yourself in this classic 19th century love story.
  

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5 stars
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3 stars
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This is a genuine love story. - Goodreads
Overall, the writing could not have been better. - Goodreads
Jane Austen was such a wonderful writer. - Christianbook.com
The "plot" borders between meaningless and trivial. - Goodreads

Review: Pride and Prejudice

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

6.0 stars. Confession...this book gave me an earth-shattering Janeaustegasm and I am feeling a bit spent and vulnerable at the moment, so please bear with me. You see, I decided I wanted to get more ... Read full review

loving it

User Review  - aeroshaker - Walmart

I have been finding the book very enjoyable, although the cover does not look the same, it doesn't matter. It is still the right book. Maybe a little more recommended for experienced readers. Read full review

All 17 reviews »

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
10
Section 3
17
Section 4
19
Section 5
32
Section 6
33
Section 7
34
Section 8
40
Section 17
94
Section 18
97
Section 19
110
Section 20
131
Section 21
137
Section 22
147
Section 23
148
Section 24
150

Section 9
61
Section 10
64
Section 11
67
Section 12
75
Section 13
77
Section 14
83
Section 15
87
Section 16
89
Section 25
152
Section 26
172
Section 27
183
Section 28
184
Section 29
186
Section 30
191
Section 31
194
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
Page 7 - Which do you mean?" and turning round he looked for a moment at Elizabeth, till catching her eye, he withdrew his own and coldly said, " She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.
Page 15 - Miss Elizabeth Bennet!' repeated Miss Bingley. 'I am all astonishment. How long has she been such a favourite? - and pray when am I to wish you joy?' 'That is exactly the question which I expected you to ask. A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment. I knew you would be wishing me joy.
Page 9 - I know you do; and it is that which makes the wonder. With your good sense to be so honestly blind to the follies and nonsense of others!

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About the author (2004)

Jane Austen's life is striking for the contrast between the great works she wrote in secret and the outward appearance of being quite dull and ordinary. Austen was born in the small English town of Steventon in Hampshire, and educated at home by her clergyman father. She was deeply devoted to her family. For a short time, the Austens lived in the resort city of Bath, but when her father died, they returned to Steventon, where Austen lived until her death at the age of 41. Austen was drawn to literature early, she began writing novels that satirized both the writers and the manners of the 1790's. Her sharp sense of humor and keen eye for the ridiculous in human behavior gave her works lasting appeal. She is at her best in such books as Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816), in which she examines and often ridicules the behavior of small groups of middle-class characters. Austen relies heavily on conversations among her characters to reveal their personalities, and at times her novels read almost like plays. Several of them have, in fact, been made into films. She is considered to be one of the most beloved British authors.

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