The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution 1926-1930 (Google eBook)

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Simon and Schuster, Mar 13, 1997 - Performing Arts - 416 pages
4 Reviews
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Review: The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution 1926-1930

User Review  - Sean O'Hara - Goodreads

A thrilling tale of format wars, patent trolls and short-sighted executives -- in 1920s Hollywood. Read full review

Review: The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution 1926-1930

User Review  - David - Goodreads

1927 brought us great silent films like Wings, The General, Metropolis, 7th Heaven and Sunrise. It also brought us the sensation that was The Jazz Singer and for the next 3 years everyone in movies ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
25
Section 2
38
Section 3
56
Section 4
75
Section 5
85
Section 6
96
Section 7
111
Section 8
122
Section 11
200
Section 12
220
Section 13
241
Section 14
272
Section 15
284
Section 16
298
Section 17
313
Section 18
347

Section 9
143
Section 10
187
Section 19
368
Copyright

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Page 6 - The film studio of today is really the palace of the sixteenth century. There one sees what Shakespeare saw: the absolute power of the tyrant, the courtiers, the flatterers, the jesters, the cunningly ambitious intriguers. There are fantastically beautiful women, there are incompetent favorites. There are great men who are suddenly disgraced. There is the most insane extravagance, and unexpected parsimony over a few pence. There is enormous splendor, which is a sham; and also horrible squalor hidden...
Page 6 - There is enormous splendor, which is a sham; and also horrible squalor hidden behind the scenery. There are vast schemes, abandoned because of some caprice. There are secrets which everybody knows and no one speaks of. There are even two or three honest advisers. These are the court fools, who speak the deepest wisdom in puns, lest they should be taken seriously. They grimace, and tear their hair privately, and weep.
Page 10 - Mama, darlin', if I'ma success in this show, well, we're gonna move from here. Oh yes, we're gonna move up in the Bronx. A lot of nice green grass up there and a whole lot of people you know. There's the Ginsbergs, the Guttenbergs, and the Goldbergs.
Page 10 - I'ma success in this show, well, we're gonna move from here. Oh yes, we're gonna move up in the Bronx. A lot of nice green grass up there and a whole lot of people you know. There's the Ginsbergs, the Guttenbergs, and the Goldbergs. Oh, a whole lotta Bergs, I don't know 'em all. "And I'm gonna buy you a nice black silk dress, Mama. You see Mrs. Friedman, the butcher's wife, she'll be jealous of you . . . Yes, she will.

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About the author (1997)

Scott Eyman has written eleven books, including biographies of Hollywood legends such as John Wayne (a New York Times bestseller), Ernst Lubitsch, Cecil B. DeMille, and Louis B. Mayer. He also collaborated with Robert Wagner on two books. He has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. He was formerly books editor of The Palm Beach Post. He lives with his wife, Lynn, in West Palm Beach. Visit him at ScottEyman.com.

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