London; Being an Accurate History and Description of the British Metropolis and Its Neighbourhood: To Thirty Miles Extent, from an Actual Perambulation, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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W. Stratford, 1807 - London (England)
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Page 288 - To paint fair Nature, by divine command, Her magic pencil in his glowing hand, A Shakespeare rose : then, to expand his fame Wide o'er this breathing world, a Garrick came. Though sunk in death the forms the Poet drew, The Actor's genius bade them breathe anew; Though, like the bard himself, in night they lay, Immortal Garrick call'd them back to day: And till Eternity with power sublime Shall mark the mortal hour of hoary Time, Shakespeare and Garrick like twin-stars shall shine, And earth irradiate...
Page 398 - And God heard the voice of the lad; and the angel of God called to Hagar out of heaven, and said unto her, What aileth thee, Hagar? Fear not; for God hath heard the voice of the lad where he is. Arise, lift up the lad, and hold him in thine hand; for I will make him a great nation.
Page 554 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk shot with silver threads ; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness ; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 370 - For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us : therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness ; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
Page 303 - No more the Grecian muse unrivall'd reigns, To Britain let the nations homage pay : She felt a Homer's fire in Milton's strains, A Pindar's rapture in the lyre of Gray.
Page 555 - Court followed next to her, very handsome and well-shaped, and for the most Part dressed in white ; she was guarded on each Side by the Gentlemen Pensioners, fifty in Number, with gilt Battleaxes. In the Antechapel next the Hall where we were, Petitions were presented to her, and she received them most graciously, which occasioned the Acclamation of, "Long live Queen Elizabeth!" She answered it with, "I thank you my good People.
Page 491 - Tabard, so called of the sign, which, as we now term it, is of a jacket, or sleeveless coat, whole before, open on both sides, with a square collar, winged at the shoulders ; a stately garment of old time, commonly worn of noblemen and others, both at home and abroad in the wars, but then (to wit in the wars) their arms embroidered, or otherwise depict upon them, that every man by his coat of arms might be known from others : but now these tabards are only worn by the heralds, and be called their...
Page 299 - Laud be to God ! even there my life must end. It hath been prophesied to me many years, I should not die but in Jerusalem ; Which vainly I supposed the Holy Land. But bear me to that chamber ; there I'll lie ; In that Jerusalem shall Harry die.
Page 554 - As she went along, in all this state and magnificence, she spoke very graciously, first to one, then to another, whether foreign ministers, or those who attended for different reasons, in English, French, and Italian ; for, besides being well skilled in Greek, Latin, and the languages I have mentioned, she is mistress of Spanish, Scotch, and Dutch.
Page 554 - Queen commonly passes on her way to chapel. At the door stood a gentleman dressed in velvet, with a gold chain, whose office was to introduce to the Queen any person of distinction that came to wait on her ; it was Sunday, when there is usually the greatest attendance of nobility. In the same hall were the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bishop of London, a great number of...

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