Continual Permutations of Action (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers - Social Science - 280 pages
2 Reviews
Although it has not been his intention to promulgate theory for its own sake, Anselm Strauss has proven himself a formidable theorist. What has prompted this new treatise on human action (or as Strauss would prefer, acting) was a dissatisfaction with the accounts of social phenomena in the received, mainline sociological literature. Derived from the survey and functionalist traditions, such accounts have simplified complexities drastically, and mostly left implicit the underlying action assumptions of their research. Rejecting Parsons and Lazarsfeld as models, Strauss traces the perspective on human action presented in Continual Permutations of Action to a very different tradition, that of the Pragmatists. Strauss's account begins with the concept of trajectory, referring to a course of action but also embracing the interaction of multiple actors and contingencies. Certain Straussian terms and motifs come rapidly into play in the earlier sections, where he maps out his account: conditional matrix, temporality, and the like. The later sections are given over to major topics, including work and its relations with other forms of action; the body; thought processes; symbolizing; social worlds and arenas; representation; the interplay of routine and creative action; and the relevance of the concept of social worlds to understanding the interplay of several levels of social order in contemporary society. Extending the limits of interactionist theory, Strauss has raised questions about interpreting social phenomena that will be debated for some time to come.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

immagine urbana Chicago pag.160

Contents

ASSUMPTIONS OF A THEORY OF ACTION
19
Basic Assumptions of a Theory of Action
21
Definitions
22
A List of Assumptions
23
A Final Comment
45
NOTES
46
AN INTERACTIONIST THEORY OF ACTION
47
Introductory Remarks
48
INTERACTING AND SYMBOLIZING
149
Language and Symbolizing
150
Symbols Symbolizing and Symbolic Products
151
Motivations Symbolizations and Interactions
153
Symbolic Universes
155
Collapse Loss and Estrangement from Symbolic Universes
157
Social Worlds and Symbolization
159
Urban Images of Chicago
160

Work A Major Form of Action
51
Trajectory and Related Concepts
52
Subconcepts
54
Additional Concepts
57
A Conditional Matrix
60
Properties and Types and Local Concepts
65
A Note on Types of Experiences
68
The Usefulness of a Theory of Action
70
A Preliminary Note and Analysis
75
WORK AND THE INTERSECTION OF FORMS OF ACTION
81
Work as Rational and Its Rationalization
82
History within the Work
84
Routines and Contingencies
85
The Centrality of Interaction for Work
86
Work in Relation to Other Forms of Action
93
Biographical Work and Its Interactions
97
BODY BODY PROCESSES AND INTERACTION
107
Body as a Necessary Condition for Action
108
Body as Agent
110
SelfAs Subject As ObjectAnd Body
111
Mental Activity and the Body
112
Intentional and Unintentional Action in Relation to Body
113
The Body and Temporal Aspects of Interaction
117
BodyMind Metaphors
118
Symbolization and the Body
119
Action Performance and Appearance
120
Body Processes
121
Having an Experience
122
INTERACTION THOUGHT PROCESS AND BIOGRAPHY
127
Thought Processes as Action
129
Thought Processes and Biographical Processes
136
A Case History
138
A Final Note
146
LargeScale Symbolization
162
Diffuse Collective Symbolizations
166
REPRESENTATION AND MISREPRESENTATION IN INTERACTION
169
Difficulties in Interpreting Representations
170
Representation versus Presentation of Self
172
Representational Interactions
173
Representing in the Interactions
176
Strategic Interaction
187
THE INTERPLAY OF ROUTINE AND NONROUTINE ACTION
191
Routine Action
193
The Complex Nature of Routines and Routine Actions
194
Routine Innovation and Creativity
200
SOCIAL WORLDS AND SOCIETY
209
Asserted or Presumed Dominance of Social Class Race Gender and Other Social Units
210
A SocialWorld Perspective
212
SocialWorld Processes
215
Social Worlds and the Nation State
219
Genocide as a Case Illustration
221
SOCIAL WORLDS AND INTERACTION IN ARENAS
225
Arenas and Social Worlds
226
Policy Arenas
227
Scientists in Policy Arenas
232
Summary Note
242
NEGOTIATED ORDER AND STRUCTURAL ORDERING
245
The Interactionist Position
246
Negotiated Order
248
Implications Concerning Order and Change
250
Processual Ordering
254
The Necessity of Processual Ordering and the Foundational Role of Matrix Conditions
255
OrderDisorder StabilityInstability and Change
258
REFERENCES
263
INDEX
275
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - No longer can man confront reality immediately; he cannot see it, as it were, face to face. Physical reality seems to recede in proportion as man's symbolic activity advances. Instead of dealing with the things themselves man is in a sense constantly conversing with himself.
Page vi - And this was, of course, connected with the very nature of the investigation. For this compels us to travel over a wide field of thought criss-cross in every direction. The philosophical remarks in this book are, as it were, a number of sketches of landscapes which were made in the course of these long and involved journeyings.
Page 21 - Social psychology studies the activity or behavior of the individual as it lies within the social process; the behavior of an individual can be understood only in terms of the behavior of the whole social group of which he is a member, since his individual acts are involved in larger, social acts which go beyond himself and which implicate the other members of that group (9, pp.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information