Scramble for Africa...

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Harper Collins, Dec 1, 1992 - History - 800 pages
32 Reviews

White Man's Conquest of the Dark Continent
from 1876 to 1912

  

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Review: The Scramble for Africa: The White Man's Conquest of the Dark Continent from 1876 to 1912

User Review  - Paul Danahar - Goodreads

The only book you need to read on this subject. Read full review

Review: The Scramble for Africa: The White Man's Conquest of the Dark Continent from 1876 to 1912

User Review  - Patrick - Goodreads

It took a while to finish this monster but it was highly rewarding. For anyone wanting a better understanding of African history after the arrival of Europeans, I recommend this book. Read full review

Contents

VII
11
VIII
24
IX
40
X
57
XI
72
XII
86
XIII
109
XIV
123
XXXI
393
XXXII
413
XXXIII
434
XXXIV
452
XXXV
470
XXXVI
484
XXXVII
487
XXXVIII
504

XV
141
XVI
143
XVII
164
XVIII
80
XIX
101
XX
118
XXI
139
XXII
157
XXIII
159
XXIV
176
XXV
197
XXVI
216
XXVII
236
XXVIII
258
XXIX
272
XXX
390
XXXIX
524
XL
539
XLI
557
XLII
583
XLIII
585
XLIV
602
XLV
616
XLVI
629
XLVII
641
XLVIII
656
XLIX
669
L
695
LI
697
LII
705
LIII
719
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vii - All I can add in my solitude is, may Heaven's rich blessing come down on every one— American, English, or Turk — who will help to heal this open sore of the world.
Page 206 - I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.
Page 172 - We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven ; that which we are, we are ; One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
Page 1 - I beg to direct your attention to Africa : I know that in a few years I shall be cut off in that country, which is now open ; do not let it be shut again ! I go back to Africa to try to make an open path for commerce and Christianity ; do you carry out the work which I have begun. I LEAVE IT WITH YOU !" In a prefatory letter prefixed to the volume entitled Dr.
Page 144 - The objects of the society are philanthropic. It does not aim at permanent political control but seeks the neutrality of the valley. The United States cannot be indifferent to this work nor to the interests of their citizens involved in it.
Page 12 - The interior is mostly a magnificent and healthy country of unspeakable richness. I have a small specimen of good coal ; other minerals, such as gold, copper, iron, and silver are abundant ; and I am confident that with a wise and liberal (not lavish) expenditure of capital, one of the greatest systems of inland navigation in the world might be utilised, and in from 30 to 36 months begin to repay any enterprising capitalists that might take the matter in hand.
Page 432 - There was a vast amount of red — good to see at any time, because one knows that some real work is done in there...
Page 123 - Lake-sources of the White Nile, come within our borders and till we finally join hands across the Equator with Natal and Cape Town, to say nothing of the Transvaal and the Orange River on the south, or of Abyssinia or Zanzibar to be swallowed by way...
Page 26 - My methods, however, will not be Livingstone's. Each man has his own way. His, I think, had its defects, though the old man, personally, has been nearly Christ-like for goodness, patience and self-sacrifice.

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About the author (1992)

Thomas Pakenham is the author of "The Scramble for Africa," which won the W. H. Smith and Alan Paton Awards.

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