An Authentic Exposition of the "K.G.C.", "Knights of the Golden Circle": Or, A History of Secession from 1834 to 1861 (Google eBook)

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C.O. Perrine, 1861 - Secession - 88 pages
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Contents

I
5
II
8
III
11
IV
21
V
27
VI
34
VII
43
VIII
55
IX
68
X
72
XI
77

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Page 19 - ... it becomes our duty, by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to maintain this provision of the Constitution against all attempts to violate it; and we deny the authority of Congress, of a territorial legislature, or of any individuals, to give legal existence to slavery in any territory of the United States.
Page 19 - That when the settlers in a Territory, having an adequate population, form a State Constitution, the right of sovereignty commences, and, being consummated by admission into the Union, they stand on an equal footing with the people of other States; and the State thus organized ought to be admitted into the Federal Union, whether its Constitution prohibits or recognizes the institution of slavery.
Page 18 - That it is in accordance with the interpretation of the Cincinnati platform, that during the existence of the Territorial Governments the measure of restriction, whatever it may be, imposed by the Federal Constitution on the power of the Territorial Legislature over the subject of the domestic relations, as the same has been, or shall hereafter be finally determined by the Supreme Court of the United States, should be respected by all good citizens, and enforced with promptness and fidelity by every...
Page 19 - That the normal condition of all the territory of the United States is that of freedom; that as our Republican fathers when they had abolished slavery in all our National territory ordained that " no person should be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law...
Page 18 - That the government of a territory organized by an act of Congress is provisional and temporary, and during its existence all citizens of the United States have an equal right to settle with their property in the territory, without their rights, either of person or property, being destroyed or impaired by congressional or territorial legislation.
Page 17 - That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its departments, to protect, when necessary, the rights of persons and property in the Territories, and wherever else its constitutional authority extends.
Page 18 - Inasmuch as differences of opinion exist in the Democratic party as to the nature and extent of the powers of a Territorial legislature, and as to the powers and duties of congress under the constitution of the United States over the institution of slavery within the Territories. Resolved, That the Democratic party will abide by the decisions of the supreme court of the United States on the questions of constitutional law.
Page 18 - ... territorial governments, the measure of restriction, whatever it may be, imposed by the Federal Constitution on the power of the territorial legislature over the subject of the domestic relations, as the same has been, or shall hereafter be, finally determined by the Supreme Court of the United States, should be respected by all good citizens, and enforced with promptness and fidelity by every branch of the General Government.
Page 81 - Southernization of 2 (Mexico,) so that in either case our success will be certain. Captain. Under the laws of 2 (Mexico,) every emigrant receives from the State authorities a grant of 640 acres of land. Under a treaty closed with 3, (Manuel Doblado, Governor of Guanajuato,) on the llth of' February, 1860, we are invited to colonize in 2, (Mexico) to enable the best people there to establish a permanent government. We agree to introduce a force of 16,000 men, armed, equipped and provided, and to take...
Page 36 - Arsenal, NY, to different arsenals at the South. The total number of improved arms, thus supplied to five depositories in the South, by a single order of the late Secretary of War, was 114,868.

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