The history of the decline and fall of the Roman empire, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

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Printed for W. Allason, 1820 - Byzantine Empire
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Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume I

User Review  - Rlotz - Goodreads

It speaks to the genius of Gibbon, and the grandeur of this work, that there are no historians or social scientists who call themselves 'Gibbonians'. There are Marxists, Freudians, Foucaultians; there ... Read full review

Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume I

User Review  - Gary - Goodreads

A linear detailed presentation of a bunch of Roman Emperors and wannabe emperors after the reign of Marcus Aurelius for which you most likely have never heard of. There's no doubt Gibbon writes better ... Read full review

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Page 83 - Of these savage heroes of the cross, Tancred alone betrayed some sentiments of compassion; yet we may praise the more selfish lenity of Raymond, who granted a capitulation and safe conduct to the garrison of the citadel.
Page 203 - As they passed along, they gazed with admiration on the capital of the East, or, as it should seem, of the earth ; rising from her seven hills, and towering over the continents of Europe and Asia. The swelling domes and lofty spires of five hundred palaces and churches were gilded by the sun and reflected in the waters : the walls were crowded with soldiers and spectators...
Page 72 - Peter, near the high altar, is concealed the steel head of the lance that pierced the side of our Redeemer. In three days that instrument of eternal, and now of temporal, salvation, will be manifested to his disciples. Search, and ye shall find : bear it aloft in battle ; and that mystic weapon shall penetrate the souls of the miscreants.
Page 427 - The desolation is complete ; and the temple of Diana or the church of Mary will equally elude the search of the curious traveller. The circus and three stately theatres of Laodicea are now peopled with wolves and foxes ; Sardis is reduced to a miserable village ; the God of...
Page 165 - By the command of the sultan the churches and fortifications of the Latin cities were demolished : a motive of avarice or fear still opened the holy sepulchre to some devout and defenceless pilgrims : and a mournful and solitary silence prevailed along the coast which had so long resounded with the WORLD'S DEBATE.
Page 18 - Cuirass,* that in six days he could discharge an entire century, by a whipping of three hundred thousand stripes. His example was followed by many penitents of both sexes ; and, as a vicarious sacrifice was accepted, a sturdy disciplinarian might expiate on his own back the sins of his...
Page 401 - Asia. Seven hundred thousand Moguls and Tartars are said to have marched under the standard of Zingis and his four sons. In the vast plains that extend to the north of the Sihon or Jaxartes, they were encountered by four hundred thousand soldiers of the sultan; and in the first battle, which was suspended by the night, one hundred and sixty thousand Carizmians were slain.
Page 160 - A more unjust and absurd constitution cannot be devised than that which condemns the natives of a country to perpetual servitude, under the arbitrary dominion of strangers and slaves. Yet such has been the state of Egypt above five hundred years. The most illustrious sultans of the Baharite and Borgite dynasties were themselves promoted from the Tartar and Circassian bands ; and the four-and-twenty beys, or military chiefs, have ever been succeeded, not by their sons, but by their servants.'!
Page 2 - I will rouse," exclaimed the hermit, " the martial nations of Europe in your cause ;" and Europe was obedient to the call of the hermit. The astonished patriarch dismissed him with epistles of credit and complaint ; and no sooner did he land at Bari, than Peter hastened to kiss the feet of the Roman pontiff.
Page 402 - The destructive hostilities of Attila and the Huns have long since been elucidated by the example of Zingis and the Moguls ; and in this more proper place I shall be content to observe, that, from the Caspian to the Indus, they ruined a tract of many hundred miles, which was adorned with the habitations and labors of mankind, and that five centuries have not been sufficient to repair the ravages of four years.

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