Paxton's Magazine of Botany, and Register of Flowering Plants, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Sir Joseph Paxton
Orr and Smith, 1837 - Botany
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Page 220 - ... which are provided for the preservation of the shoots in the winter season. Some idea may be formed of the prodigiously increased drain upon the functions of a plant arising from an increase of dryness in the air from the following consideration. If we suppose the amount of its perspiration, in a given time, to be 57 grains, the temperature of the air being 75, and the dew-point 70...
Page 54 - ... eighty pounds. But reckoning the weight of a cluster only at forty pounds, such a plantation would produce more than four thousand pounds of nutritive substance. M. Humboldt calculates that as thirty-three pounds of wheat and ninety-nine pounds of potatoes require the same space as that in which four thousand pounds of bananas are grown, the produce of bananas is consequently to that of wheat as 133 : 1, and to that of potatoes as 44 : 1.
Page 247 - January, and will come in flower about the middle of March. When these plants have done flowering, and are removed from the drawing-room or greenhouse, I prune out most of the old shoots that have flowered, so that the plants are furnished regularly with young shoots for flowering the ensuing year; these plants are also placed in the forcing-house for ten days, to ripen the young wood and dry up the moisture, and are then put to rest in the greenhouse as usual: such plants will flower a second time...
Page 54 - At the same time, a much greater number of individuals may be supported upon the produce of a piece of ground planted with bananas, compared with a piece of the same size in Europe growing wheat. Humboldt estimates the proportion as twenty-five to one ; and he illustrates the fact by remarking that a European, newly arrived in the torrid zone, is struck with nothing so much as the extreme smallness of the spots under cultivation round a cabin which contains a numerous family of Indians.
Page 37 - ... that it had a flat grass-like taste, but I experienced the full power of its stimulating principles. When taken in the evening it was followed by great restlessness, loss of sleep, and generally uncomfortable sensations; while, from its exhibition in the morning, a similar effect, though to a slight degree, arose, accompanied with loss of appetite. The English physician, Dr. Archibald Smith, who has a sugar plantation near Huanuco, once, when unprovided with Chinese tea, made a trial of the coca...
Page 37 - Piippig to be of so very volatile a nature that leaves only twelve months old become perfectly inert and good for nothing. " Large heaps of the freshly-dried leaves, particularly while the warm rays of the sun are upon them, diffuse a very strong smell, resembling that of hay in which there is a quantity of melilot The natives never permit strangers to sleep near them, as they would suffer violent headaches in consequence. When kept in small portions, and after a few months, the coca loses its scent...
Page 223 - ... protection may be seen when the pots are plunged into the soil, a method which communicates the greatest luxuriance to the plants, but unfits them to resume their winter stations. When a green-house is made use of, as it often is, after the removal of the pots, to force the vine, the same precautions should be attended to as in the management of the hot-house, and the elasticity of the vapour should be maintained by wetting the floor; but after a certain period a great degree of dryness should...
Page 220 - ... transpiration should proceed ; but there is no danger that the high temperature of the hot-house should ever attain the point of saturation by spontaneous evaporation. The temperature of the external air will always keep down the force of the vapour ; for as in the natural atmosphere the dew-point at the surface of the earth is...
Page 161 - ... from the rain and dews, which would retard the process of ripening; but no sooner is the ripening completed, than the capsule becomes upright with the calyx for a support. This upright position appears to be intended by nature to give more effect to the valvular mechanism for scattering the seeds, as it thus gains a higher elevation (in some cases more than an inch) from which to project them ; and this will give it, according to the laws of projectiles, a very considerable increase of horizontal...
Page 160 - Before the seed is ripe, the capsule hangs in a drooping position, with the persisting calyx spread over it like an umbrella, to guard it from the rain and dews, which would retard the process of ripening; but no sooner is the ripening completed, than the capsule becomes upright with the calyx for a support. This upright position appears to be intended by nature to give more effect to the valvular mechanism for scattering the seeds, as...

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