The World of Athens

Front Cover
Joint Association of Classical Teachers
Cambridge University Press, Jan 30, 1984 - History - 407 pages
3 Reviews
The World of Athens is a serious, up-to-date account of the history and culture of fifth century Athens for adults, university students and sixth-formers with an intelligent interest in ancient Greece. The book, which is profusely illustrated, contains chapters on all aspects of the history, culture, values and achievements of Athenian life. Teachers and students of Reading Greek now have a full and instant guide to the cultural and historical topics in which the course is so diverse and rich. The book is essential for all users of Reading Greek.
  

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Review: The World of Athens

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

A well round text book. Read full review

Review: The World of Athens

User Review  - Nikki J - Goodreads

One of my text books for the year. I'll write a review at the end of the course, but so far it's proving a common sense, easy to search and understand piece of excellence. Well-written and compiled. Read full review

Contents

The physical environment
62
The metaphysical environment
89
Human obligations values and concerns
132
Athenian society
153
Athenian democracy and imperialism
196
Athens at war
244
The intellectual world
276
other worlds
353
GLOSSARY OF TERMS WITH GREEK ALPHABET
359
CROSSREFERENCES WITH THE TEXT OF READING GREEK
374
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS FOR PHOTOGRAPHS AND DRAWINGS
381
INDEX
389
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 56 - If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differences; if to social standing, advancement in public life falls to reputation for capacity, class considerations not being allowed to interfere with merit; nor again does poverty bar the way, if a man is able to serve the state, he is not hindered by the obscurity of his condition.
Page 59 - ... you must yourselves realize the power of Athens, and feed your eyes upon her from day to day, till love of her fills your hearts; and then, when all her greatness shall break upon you, you must reflect that it was by courage, sense of duty, and a keen feeling of honour in action that men were enabled to win all this...
Page 60 - These take as your model, and judging happiness to be the fruit of freedom and freedom of valour, never decline the dangers of war. For it is not the miserable that would most justly be unsparing of their lives; these have nothing to hope for: it is rather they to whom continued life may bring reverses as yet unknown, and to whom a fall, if it came, would be most tremendous in its consequences. And surely, to a man of spirit, the degradation of cowardice must be immeasurably more grievous than the...
Page 56 - Our constitution does not copy the laws of neighbouring states; we are rather a pattern to others than imitators ourselves. Its administration favours the many instead of the few; this is why it is called a democracy. If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differences; if to social standing, advancement in public life...
Page 60 - Turning to the sons or brothers of the dead, I see an arduous struggle before you. When a man is gone, all are wont to praise him, and should your merit be ever so transcendent, you will still find it difficult not merely to overtake, but even to approach their renown. The living have envy to contend with, while those who are no longer in our path are honoured with a goodwill into which rivalry does not enter.
Page 57 - The freedom which we enjoy in our government extends also to our ordinary life. There, far from exercising a jealous surveillance over each other, we do not feel called upon to be angry with our neighbour for doing what he likes, or even to indulge in those injurious looks which cannot fail to be offensive, although they inflict no positive penalty.
Page 58 - We cultivate refinement without extravagance and knowledge without effeminacy; wealth we employ more for use than for show, and place the real disgrace of poverty not in owning to the fact but in declining the struggle against it.
Page 58 - ... any opportunity of learning or observing, although the eyes of an enemy may occasionally profit by our liberality ; trusting less in system and policy than to the native spirit of our citizens ; while in education, where our rivals from their very cradles by a painful discipline seek after manliness, at Athens we live exactly as we please, and yet are just as ready to encounter every legitimate danger.

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