Media, Gender, and Identity: An Introduction

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Psychology Press, 2002 - Social Science - 278 pages
4 Reviews
Media, Gender and Identityis an accessible introduction to the relationship between media and gender identities today. It begins with an assessment of the different ways in which gender and identity have previously been studied and provides new ways for thinking about the media's influence on gender and sexuality. David Gauntlett explores the gender landscape of contemporary media and draws on recent theories of identity negotiation and queer theory to understand the place of popular media in people's lives. Using a range of examples from films, television programs, and men's and women's magazines,Media, Gender and Identityshows how the media are used in the shaping of individual self-identity. The book is supported by a regularly updated website at: www.theoryhead.com/gender.
  

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Review: Media, Gender and Identity: An Introduction

User Review  - Mariam Abood - Goodreads

This book was amazing and seriously insightful, so if you're doing Media Studies at A-level, I highly recommend you read this book. This book offered an intelligent and insightful look into films, and ... Read full review

Review: Media, Gender and Identity: An Introduction

User Review  - Katy Leigh - Goodreads

Good material but author inserts opinion excessively. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
11
Some background debates
19
Representations of gender in the past
43
Representations of gender today
57
Giddens modernity and selfidentity
91
discourses and lifestyles
115
Queer theory and fluid identities
134
Mens magazines and modern male identities
153
Womens magazines and female identities today
181
role models pop music and selfhelp discourses
211
Conclusions
247
References
257
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About the author (2002)

DAvid Gauntlett is Professor of Media and Audiences at the University of Bournemouth. Ross Horsley is completing a Ph.D. at the Institute of Communication Studies, University of Leeds.

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