John of Salisbury: Policraticus

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 26, 1990 - History - 240 pages
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John of Salisbury (c. 1115-1180) was the foremost political theorist of his age. He was trained in scholastic theology and philosophy at Paris, and his writings are invaluable for summarizing many of the metaphysical speculations of his time. The Policraticus is his main work, and is regarded as the first complete work of political theory to be written in the Latin Middle Ages. Cary Nederman's new edition and translation, currently the only version available in English, is primarily aimed at undergraduate students of the history of political thought and medieval history. His new translation shows how important this text is in understanding the mores, forms of conduct and beliefs of the most powerful and learned segments of twelfth century Western Europe.
  

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Contents

Prologue
3
BOOK I
9
That pride is the root of all evil
17
That the Romans are dedicated to vanity
22
On the difference between the prince
28
That the authority of divine law consists
35
That the ruler must have the law of
41
Of the moderation of the princes justice
49
Chapter ig Of the honour to be exhibited by soldiers
122
Who are the feet of the republic
125
The vices of the powerful are to
131
Of the coherence of the head and
137
BOOK VII
145
Of the errors of the Academics and
150
That virtue is the unique path to being
156
Of ambition and that passion
162

Chapter n What are the other rewards of princes
56
BOOK V
65
What bad and good happen to subjects
75
Of those who hold the place of the heart
81
Of the eyes ears and tongue of
91
What pertains to the sacred calling
95
BOOK VI
103
That military service requires selection
109
The armed soldier is by necessity bound
115
Of the love and acclaim of liberty and
175
BOOK VIII
181
Of the four rivers which spring for Epi
188
Tyrants are the ministers of God
201
All tyrants reach a miserable end
210
The counsel of Brutus is to be used
216
What is the most faithful path to be fol
225
Index
233
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

John of Salisbury learned about court life as secretary first to Thibaud, and then to Thomas a Becket, both archbishops of Canterbury. He later became bishop of Chartres. His books are urbane and clearly written, providing a cultured view of the upper-class society of the twelfth century.

Cary J. Nederman is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Arizona. His most recent books include Three Tracts on Empire: Engelbert of Admont, Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini, and Juan de Torquemada (co-edited and co-translated with T. M. Izbicki) (1999) and Beyond the Persecuting Society: Religious Toleration Before the Enlightenment (co-edited with J. C. Laursen) (1998).

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