Hints on heraldry, for the use of ladies (Google eBook)

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1853
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Page 1 - tis a greater mystery, in the art Of painting, to foreshorten any part, Than draw it out ; so 'tis in books the chief Of all perfections to be plain and brief.
Page 27 - University degree also conferring gentility. 4. The Gentleman by occupation, one whose employment is not only honest but honourable. Esquires are, 1. The sons of all the Peers and Lords of Parliament in the lives of their fathers ; the younger sons of Peers after the death of their fathers ; the eldest sons of the younger sons of Peers and their eldest sons in perpetual succession. 2. Noblemen of all nations. 3. The eldest and (Mr. Burke thinks if any, all) sons of Baronets, and the eldest sous of...
Page 27 - Barristers-at-law, by their office or profession. 8. Justices of the peace, and mayors, while in the commission, or in office. 9. Persons chosen Esquires to the body of the Prince, now obsolete. 10. Persons attending on the Sovereign's coronation in some notable employment, or persons employed in...
Page 28 - ... marrying, keep the style of Honourable. Peeresses in their own right marrying commoners likewise retain their proper title, not by courtesy, but legally, and also continue it when matching with persons 'of the same degree ; but when they marry with persons of superior dignity, they then use their husband's titles. Widows of Peers, Baronets, and Knights, legally retain their titles, gained by marriage, during widowhood; but if they marry inferiors lose them, though it is usual to give them their...
Page 28 - Knights are called likewise called Sir before the christian name, with the addition of Knight after the surname, and their wives are also termed Ladies; but it should be noted, that when the wives or widows of either Baronets or Knights are designated by their christian names, the title of Lady should not be prefixed, but added after, and placed immediately before the surname, or they would appear like the daughters of Dukes, Marquisses, and Earls, who take the title of Lady before their Christian...
Page 8 - ... also gold, the whole enriched with precious stones : cap of crimson velvet, turned up erm. Badges— \. ENGLAND — The red and white rose united. 2. SCOTLAND— A thistle. 3.
Page 28 - Honourable," and when, the daughters of Dukes, Marquisses, or Earls marry commoners, they still retain the title of Lady adding their christian names to those of their husbands: and in like manner the daughters of Barons, when so marrying, keep the style of Honourable. Peeresses in their own right marrying commoners likewise retain their proper title, not by courtesy, but legally, and also continue it when matching with persons 'of the same degree ; but when they marry with persons of superior dignity,...
Page 27 - ... courtesy, take the second title of their father, and the younger sons are called Lords, with the addition of their Christian names; and all the daughters are stiled Ladies in the same manner. Marquisses Marquisses are likewise designated The Most Noble, and in common parlance called Lord Marquis : their eldest sons take in like manner the second title, and the younger sons and all the daughters are, like those of Dukes, denominated Lords and Ladies, with the addition of their christian names....
Page 27 - ... the second title, and the younger sons and all the daughters are, like those of Dukes, denominated Lords and Ladies, with the addition of their christian names. Earls have the title of Lordship, the eldest son by courtesy likewise taking the second title, but the younger have only that of Honourable; all the daughters however are called Ladies, adding their christian names, like the daughters of Dukes and Marquisses. Viscounts are designated the same as Earls, and the sons and daughters have...
Page 27 - SS., and spurs of silver — now obsolete. 5. Persons to whom the Queen gives arms by her own letters patent, with the title of Esquire. 6. Esquires of the Bath, and the eldest sons of those Esquires, pursuant to the statutes of the Order. 7.

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