The Global Food Economy: The Battle for the Future of Farming

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Zed Books, Jul 15, 2007 - Political Science - 217 pages
2 Reviews
This book sets out some answers to the question: how can we build an ecologically sustainable and humane system of food production and distribution? The modern food economy is a paradox. Surplus 'food mountains' sit alongside global malnutrition and the developed world subsidizes its own agriculture while pressurizing the developing world to liberalize at all costs. Export competition is increasingly aggressive whilst the reliance on imports in many countries has worrying implications for food security. Family farms go out of business and dispossessed peasant farmers are driven into urban slums. The WTO's uneven application of neoliberal economics to food production is relatively new, and the consequences of mounting deficits, rising 'food miles', and social upheaval, are untested but ominous.
  

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Review: The Global Food Economy: The Battle for the Future of Farming

User Review  - Hüseyin Ergun - Goodreads

I didn't finish it yet but It is a problem that there is not a theoretical background on this book Some Marxist ideas but they are not well supported... Read full review

Review: The Global Food Economy: The Battle for the Future of Farming

User Review  - Willy Miller - Goodreads

Boring and riddled with typos. You can get the information he is presenting in a myriad of other books. The only reason it doesn't get a 1 star is because the information he is presenting is important. Read full review

Contents

Preface
11
The temperate grainlivestock complex
47
From colonialism to global market integration
89
The battle for the future of farming
161
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Tony Weis (Ph.D., Queen’s University) is Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Western Ontario, Canada. His research is principally interested in examining how global agrarian change is interacting with the spatial marginality of small farmers, related social and environmental problems, and struggles for land reform. He has published in various journals, including the Journal of Peasant Studies, Capital and Class, the Journal of Agrarian Change, Capital, Nature, Socialism, and Global Environmental Change.

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