A Journey Through Time: Exploring the Universe with the Hubble Space Telescope

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Penguin Studio, 1995 - Political Science - 232 pages
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Barbree, coauthor of Moonshot (LJ 4/15/94) and a TV space journalist, and science fiction novelist Caidin survey the universe as seen by modern astronomers. Their prose is lush, and the color photographs are beautiful. After opening with an account of the initial failure of the Hubble optical system and its repair by a skilled and daring team of astronauts, the authors drift away from the Hubble story for whole chapters at a time; the text and the photos are derived from many sources, not just the Hubble Telescope. Compared with Carolyn Peterson's Hubble Vision (LJ 11/15/95), this new book is far more readable for the general public, but it gives far less scientific and technical detail and tells disappointingly less about the Hubble Telescope's work. Recommended chiefly for public and secondary school libraries.?Jack W. Weigel, Univ. of Michigan Lib., Ann Arbor.

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A journey through time: exploring the universe with the Hubble Space Telescope

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Barbree, coauthor of Moonshot (LJ 4/15/94) and a TV space journalist, and science fiction novelist Caidin survey the universe as seen by modern astronomers. Their prose is lush, and the color ... Read full review

Contents

First Light
7
Splendor Solis
11
Inner Circle
25
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

Jay Barbree has worked for NBC News for over 50 years. He is the only reporter to have covered all 166 American astronaut flights and moon landings. He received an Emmy for his coverage of Neil Armstrong's first walk on the moon. He wrote several books including Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight and Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings with astronauts Alan Shepard, Deke Slayton, and Neil Armstrong.

Martin Caidin is one of the outstanding aeronautics and aviation authorities in the world. He is also a member of the TenTon Club of England for his supersonic flying in the earlier days of "Mach-busting," and is as well known for his stunt flying and airshow performances as he is for writing. Of his more than 40 novels, "Cyborg "became his best known work when it was developed into the "Six Million Dollar Man" and "Bionic Woman" television series.

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